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I need to improve my query which has more than 8 joins and consumes lot of total tablespace.

Following is the query:

select r.id, uc.contributor_full_name,s.code,
       d.text, ucs.moderation_status, v.url
  from review r, user_contribution uc, user_contribution_status ucs,
       video v, description d, video_description vd, location_video lv,
       accommodation_video av, system s
 where r.user_contribution_id = ucs.user_contribution_id and
       uc.id = ucs.user_contribution_id and
       uc.system_id = s.id and
       r.accommodation_id = av.accommodation_id or
       r.location_id = lv.location_id and
       av.video_id = v.id and
       lv.video_id = v.id and
       v.id = vd.video_id and
       vd.description_id = d.id;

Is there any better way to write this query?

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3  
That or in the middle is a bit suspicious, appears that some of the tables are unconstrained on either side of it. Recheck your logic, and post the explain plan at least. –  Mat Aug 8 '13 at 4:42
    
please post the explain plan. –  planben Aug 8 '13 at 5:02
    
Thank you for your answer. We have two different tables for Locatio_videos and Accommodation videos. In review table we have two different columns for Accommodation and Location. If review is about accommodation, Location column would be null and vice versa. This is the reason I have used 'OR' Clause. –  user2663104 Aug 8 '13 at 5:17
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1 Answer

With a query like this it's possible Oracle will default to a whole lot of hash joins and full table scans, which may or may not be a good idea.

+1 to post the explain plan. Until then, don't upvote this answer!

I believe your query is equivalent to this, and it's possible that when you look at the explain plan that you'll see Oracle will convert it to something like this anyway:

select r.id
      ,uc.contributor_full_name,s.code
      ,d.text
      ,ucs.moderation_status
      ,v.url
from   review r
join   user_contribution_status ucs on r.user_contribution_id = ucs.user_contribution_id
join   user_contribution uc on uc.id = ucs.user_contribution_id
join   system s on uc.system_id = s.id
join   accommodation_video av on r.accommodation_id = av.accommodation_id
join   video_description vd on v.id = vd.video_id
join   description d on vd.description_id = d.id
join   video v on av.video_id = v.id
union all
select r.id
      ,uc.contributor_full_name,s.code
      ,d.text
      ,ucs.moderation_status
      ,v.url
from   review r
join   user_contribution_status ucs on r.user_contribution_id = ucs.user_contribution_id
join   user_contribution uc on uc.id = ucs.user_contribution_id
join   system s on uc.system_id = s.id
join   location_video lv on r.location_id = lv.location_id 
join   video_description vd on v.id = vd.video_id
join   description d on vd.description_id = d.id
join   video v on lv.video_id = v.id;

Warning: I may have made some assumptions about constraints (e.g. PK, FK and not null) on some of the ID columns, esp. with regards to accommodation_video and location_video. I removed them from the subclauses with the assumption that they weren't necessary - but this assumption may be wrong.

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Thank you Jeffrey. –  user2663104 Aug 8 '13 at 14:26
    
I think I need to update my knowledge about joins. I will update you about the result. –  user2663104 Aug 8 '13 at 14:26
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