Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

i found this python snippet for testing if a number is prime and i cant figure out why the algorithm works

def isprime(n):
   """Returns True if n is prime"""
   if n == 2: return True
   if n == 3: return True
   if n % 2 == 0: return False
   if n % 3 == 0: return False

   i = 5
   w = 2
   while i * i <= n:
      if n % i == 0:
         return False

      i += w
      w = 6 - w

   return True
share|improve this question

migrated from codereview.stackexchange.com Aug 8 '13 at 4:46

This question came from our site for peer programmer code reviews.

    
This is more of a stackoverflow question –  tomdemuyt Aug 8 '13 at 0:59
3  
This question appears to be off-topic because it is about understanding code snippets. Maybe for stackoverflow? –  Stuart Aug 8 '13 at 1:01
1  
It is off topic, but what its doing is just testing to see if its 2, or 3, or divisible by 2 or 3, and then testing against each odd number that isn't divisible by 3 (every second odd number is divisible by three.) up to its square root (no prime factor can be greater than a number's square root). Its slightly better than a naïve brute force. But its still brute force. Pretty slow way to do it. –  scott_fakename Aug 8 '13 at 1:10

2 Answers 2

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Let's start with the first four lines of the function's code:

def isprime(n):
    if n == 2: return True
    if n == 3: return True
    if n % 2 == 0: return False
    if n % 3 == 0: return False

The function tests to see if n is equal to 2 or 3 first. Since they are both prime numbers, the function will return True if n is equal to either.

Next, the function tests to see if n is divisible by 2 or 3 and returning False if either is true. This eliminates an extremely large amount of cases because half of all numbers above two are not primes - they are divisible by 2. The same reason applies to testing for divisibility by 3 - it also eliminates a large number of cases.

The trickier part of the function is in the next few lines:

i = 5
w = 2
while i * i <= n:
    if n % i == 0:
        return False

    i += w
    w = 6 - w

return True

First, i (or index) is set to 5. 2 and 3 have already been tested, and 4 was tested with n % 2. So, it makes sense to start at 5.

Next, w is set to 2. w seems to be an "incrementor". By now, the function has tested for all even numbers (n % 2), so it would be faster to increment by 2.

The function enters a while loop with the condition i * i <= n. This test is used because every composite number has a proper factor less than or equal to its square root.

In the while loop, if n is divisible by i, then it is not prime and the function returns False. If it is not, i is incremented by the "incrementor" w, which, again, is faster.

Perhaps the trickiest part of the function lies in the second-to-last line: w = 6 - w. This causes the "incrementor" w to toggle between the values 2 and 4 with each pass through loop. In cases where w is 4, we are bypassing a number divisible by 3. This is faster than remaining at 2 because the function already tested for divisibility by both 2 and 3.

Finally, the function returns True. If the function hasn't detected any cases where n is divisible by something, then it must be a prime number.

share|improve this answer

Except 2 and 3 all prime number can represent using (6*n)+1 or (6*n)-1, where n is 0 to infinite. This program is working according to this idea. Using this lines check number can divisible by 2 or 3

 if n % 2 == 0: return False
 if n % 3 == 0: return False

Then we need to check number can divisible by other prime numbers grater than 3.

i = 5
w = 2
while i * i <= n:
   if n % i == 0:
       return False

   i += w
   w = 6 - w

The next prime number is 5. Therefore initial value of i set as 5. To get all number in set (6*n)+1 or (6*n)-1 alternatively change the value of w (2,4). And this snippet used to check up to square root of the number.

 while i * i <= n:

This code is not efficient because some non prime numbers in set (6*n)+1 or (6*n)-1.

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.