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I don't want to parse some of my subdirectories. For that, what are the things I can modify in these function below.

 use File::Find;
 find(\&wanted, @directories_to_search);
 sub wanted { ... }

Here is my directory tree:

LOG
├── a.txt
├── b.txt
└── sdlog
    ├── 1log
    │   ├── a.txt
    │   └── b.txt
    └── 2log
        ├── a.txt
        └── b.txt
    |__abcd
    |__efgh

I want to parse sdlogs and 1log. Apart from these subdirectories, I don't want to parse any other.

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closed as off-topic by devnull, Brad Mace, RC., amon, Ilmari Karonen Mar 1 '14 at 19:05

This question appears to be off-topic. The users who voted to close gave this specific reason:

  • "Questions asking for code must demonstrate a minimal understanding of the problem being solved. Include attempted solutions, why they didn't work, and the expected results. See also: Stack Overflow question checklist" – devnull, Brad Mace, RC.
If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

1  
So it seems that you want to find only in LOG/sdlog/1log. –  devnull Aug 8 '13 at 5:44
    
@ devnull .. Yes u are correct –  Maverick Aug 8 '13 at 5:54
2  
How about reading the manual? –  RC. Aug 8 '13 at 5:59
    
Sir i have done it but could not get it .. that is the reason i have asked question here –  Maverick Aug 8 '13 at 6:06
    
I don't understand. Do you only care about one directory(1log)? Or can there possibly be more directories you want to search through below it? –  chrsblck Aug 8 '13 at 6:09

1 Answer 1

You don't want File::Find here.

Have a look at opendir and readdir.

use warnings;
use strict;

# you probably want to use the abs. path
my $dir = "testdir";
opendir(my $dh, $dir);
# grep out directory files from the list of files to work on
# this will also skip "." and "..", obviously :)
my @files = grep { ! -d } readdir $dh;
closedir $dh;

# change to the given directory, as readdir doesn't return the relative path
# to @files. If you don't want to chdir, you can prepend the $dir to $file as 
# you operate on the $file
chdir $dir;
for my $file (@files) {
    # do stuff.. 
    # E.g., "open my $fh, ">>", $file;", etc

    print $file, "\n";
}

OUTPUT

$ ./test.pl
a_file.txt
b_file.txt
c_file.txt
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