Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I have requirement to get the total count of records along with paging. At present I am doing it as listed below in SQL Server 2012. This needs a separate query for getting count. Is there any improved way in SQL Server 2012?

ALTER PROCEDURE dbo.tpGetPageRecords
(
    @OffSetRowNo INT,     
    @FetchRowNo INT,
    @TotalCount INT OUT
) 
AS 

SELECT CSTNO, CSTABBR 
FROM DBATABC
WHERE CSTABBR LIKE 'A%'
ORDER BY CSTNO
OFFSET ( @OffSetRowNo-1 ) * @FetchRowNo ROWS
FETCH NEXT @FetchRowNo ROWS ONLY

SET @TotalCount = 
(SELECT COUNT(*)
FROM DBATABC
WHERE CSTABBR LIKE 'A%')


GO
share|improve this question
1  
Are we allowed to change how the total count is returned back (I.e. no longer pass it back as an output parameter)? –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Aug 8 '13 at 6:42
    
@Damien_The_Unbeliever. My only requirement is - I need to get the total count. The approach doesn't matter –  Lijo Aug 8 '13 at 6:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 10 down vote accepted

If we're allowed to change the contract, you can have:

SELECT CSTNO, CSTABBR,COUNT(*) OVER () as TotalCount
FROM DBATABC
WHERE CSTABBR LIKE 'A%'
ORDER BY CSTNO
OFFSET ( @OffSetRowNo-1 ) * @FetchRowNo ROWS
FETCH NEXT @FetchRowNo ROWS ONLY

And now the total will be available as a separate column in the result set. Unfortunately, there's no way to assign this value to a variable in this same statement, so we can no longer provide it as an OUT parameter.

This uses the OVER clause (available since 2005) to allow an aggregate to be computed over the entire (unlimited) result set and without requiring GROUPing.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks.. It works.... How about the performance in general. Is this approach going to produce a fatser result? –  Lijo Aug 8 '13 at 6:59
1  
@Lijo - performance is a difficult thing to make general statements about - without having your tables, your data, knowing what exact versions (including service packs, hotfixes, etc) you're running on, what hardware, etc. All I can say is that I'd be remarkably surprised if it performed worse than your current one. –  Damien_The_Unbeliever Aug 8 '13 at 7:04
1  
@Lijo, there is a lot of ifs and buts here but I have yet to see a case where the inline count outperform the two queries in the question. All rows matched in the where clause goes to a lazy spool that is then used twice. Once for the count and once to get all the rows again for the top operator. Bottom line is you need to test on the data you have. –  Mikael Eriksson Aug 8 '13 at 7:59
1  
Performance is AWFUL!! Tested in a table with 1 mil records 2268ms vs 9ms normal count + 68ms (the actual select taking just a 100 records page) –  DotNetWise Sep 11 at 8:50

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.