Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

What is the difference of performance between standalone procedure and packaged procedure? Which will be good performance wise and why? Is there any difference in execution of both?

share|improve this question
    
Can i edit title & how? –  P Sharma Nov 28 '09 at 10:02

5 Answers 5

up vote 8 down vote accepted

Tom says:

Always use a package.
Never use a standalone procedure except for demos, tests and standalone utilities (that call nothing and are called by nothing)

There you can also find a very good discussion about their performance. Just search for "performance" on that page.
If still seriously in doubt, you can always test yourself which one is faster. You'll certainly learn something new by doing so.

My take on your question: while it's true that calling package procedures/functions seems to be slower in certain situations than calling standalone procedures/functions, the advantages offered by the additional features available when using packages far outweigh the performance loss. So, just like Tom puts it, use packages.


The link: http://asktom.oracle.com/pls/asktom/f?p=100:11:0::::P11_QUESTION_ID:7452431376537


Test code(20 million calls, runstats_pkg is a package I wrote based on the runstats package by Tom Kyte):

CREATE OR REPLACE PACKAGE testperf AS
   FUNCTION pow(i INT) RETURN INT;
END;
/

CREATE OR REPLACE PACKAGE BODY testperf AS
   FUNCTION pow(i int) RETURN INT AS
   BEGIN
      RETURN i * i;
   END;
END;
/

CREATE OR REPLACE FUNCTION powperf(i INT) RETURN INT AS
BEGIN
   RETURN i * i;
END;
/

DECLARE
   I INT;
   S INT DEFAULT 0;
BEGIN
   runstats_pkg.start1;
   FOR I IN 1 .. 20000000 LOOP
      s := s + (powperf(i) / i);
   END LOOP;
   runstats_pkg.stop1;

   dbms_output.put_line(s);
   s := 0;

   runstats_pkg.start2;
   FOR I IN 1 .. 20000000 LOOP
      s := s + (testperf.pow(i) / i);
   END LOOP;
   runstats_pkg.stop2;

   dbms_output.put_line(s);

   runstats_pkg.show;
END;

Results(Oracle XE):

Run1 latches total versus runs -- difference and pct
        Run1        Run2        Diff       Pct
       2,491       2,439         -52    102.13%

Run1 ran in 2304 hsecs
Run2 ran in 2364 hsecs
run 1 ran in 97.46% of the time

Results(Oracle 11g R1, different machine):

Run1 latches total versus runs -- difference and pct
        Run1        Run2        Diff       Pct
       2,990       3,056          66     97.84%

Run1 ran in 2071 hsecs
Run2 ran in 2069 hsecs
run 1 ran in 100.1% of the time

So, there you go. Really not much of a difference. Want data for something more complex that also involves SQL DML? You gotta test it yourself.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you please send me url where i can read this article written by Tom Kyte? –  P Sharma Nov 28 '09 at 17:19
2  
there is a link to it, click on "says" –  Marius Burz Nov 28 '09 at 17:26
    
there is no practical reason described about performance. –  P Sharma Nov 29 '09 at 17:02
    
@P Sharma, maybe you should do some benchmarking yourself (How hard can that be?). Call a million times your standalone procedure with some parameters and a million times the same procedure within a package with the same parameters. Use packages because Oracle advices the use of packages unless you find that your standalone procedures is really significantly faster than the same procedure within a package. –  tuinstoel Nov 29 '09 at 17:53
1  
I got very curious about this, so I did a test myself. The results speak for themselves: no difference results from calling a standalone function vs a package function. –  Marius Burz Nov 29 '09 at 18:38

There isn't a performance difference except that packages can have state and standalone procedures and functions not.

The use of package is more about ordening and grouping of code. You could see them as an alternative of namespaces.

share|improve this answer
    
Can you please give any business case? –  P Sharma Nov 28 '09 at 9:31
    
Just google. I don't know what business cases make sense to you. –  tuinstoel Nov 28 '09 at 9:34
    
What do you mean by state or packages? –  P Sharma Nov 28 '09 at 9:45
1  
Here an example of a very simple package that has state (a global variable). java2s.com/Tutorial/Oracle/0540__Function-Procedure-Packages/… Variable gv_countryUSA_cd lives outside a procedure or function, one or more procedures and functions within that package can share this variable. –  tuinstoel Nov 28 '09 at 10:09
1  
Yes, when you declare the global variable in the package specification, this global can be read and written by others packages, functions and procedures. The package specification is public, the package body is private. Packages can provide encapsulation, it's up to the developer if (s)he wants to use encapsulation. –  tuinstoel Nov 28 '09 at 13:08

There should be no difference between the two.

A major use of packages is to group a set of similar/associeted functions+procedures

share|improve this answer
    
There should be, otherwise why standalone procedure are used. –  P Sharma Nov 28 '09 at 9:24
1  
Oracle advises to use packages but it can't drop the support or stanalone procs and functions because it wants to be backward compatible. –  tuinstoel Nov 28 '09 at 9:31
    
But how will it be performing better? –  P Sharma Nov 29 '09 at 16:53

The primary reason to use packages is they break the dependency chain. For instance if you have two stand-alone procedures, procedure A which calls procedure B and you recompile procedure B you will also need to recompile procedure A. This gets quite complicated as you increase the number of procedures and functions.

If you move these to two to different packages you will not need to recompile them as long as the specification does not change.

share|improve this answer
    
But if package/procedure is in valid state, then there will not be any difference in the terms of dependency. –  P Sharma Nov 29 '09 at 16:52

The other answers here are all good (e.g. packages have state, they separate interface from implementation, etc).

Another difference is when procedures or packages are wrapped - it is simple to unwrap a procedure, but not a package body.

share|improve this answer
    
Question is about performance, not about sequrity –  P Sharma Nov 29 '09 at 8:34
    
Do you have a citation that unwrapping a package body is substantially harder than unwrapping a procedure? I've read Pete Finnigan's work on unwrapping PL/SQL and I don't recall seeing anything that indicates that one sort of PL/SQL block is any more difficult to unwrap than any other. –  Justin Cave Nov 29 '09 at 14:00
    
Sorry, missed that the Q was re performance only. Cave: I know it is in theory possible but I haven't come across any tools for unwrapping package bodies. If there is I wwWould be very interested! blackhat.com/presentations/bh-usa-06/BH-US-06-Finnigan.pdf - "Write PL/SQL as packages; DIANA is not stored in the database" –  Jeffrey Kemp Nov 30 '09 at 15:10

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.