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I am building a small application simulating a horse race in order to gain some basic skill in working with threads.

My code contains this loop:

        for (int i = 0; i < numberOfHorses; i++)
        {
            horsesThreads[i] = new Thread(horsesTypes[i].Race);
            horsesThreads[i].Start(100);
        }

In order to keep the race 'fair', I've been looking for a way to make all newly created threads wait until the rest of the new threads are set, and only then launch all of them to start running their methods (Please note that I understand that technically the threads can't be launched at the 'same time')

So basically, I am looking for something like this:

        for (int i = 0; i < numberOfHorses; i++)
        {
            horsesThreads[i] = new Thread(horsesTypes[i].Race);
        }
        Monitor.LaunchThreads(horsesThreads);
share|improve this question
    
You could use TPL and set up a list of Tasks? unless you specifically want to learn this way? – christiandev Aug 8 '13 at 7:48
    
In the new .net framework you have the async keyword. Word cheching out for updating your skills. – lordkain Aug 8 '13 at 7:49
    
@lordkain that, however, has nothing to do with this scenario – Marc Gravell Aug 8 '13 at 8:19
up vote 1 down vote accepted

The Barrier class is designed to support this.

Here's an example:

using System;
using System.Threading;

namespace Demo
{
    class Program
    {
        private void run()
        {
            int numberOfHorses = 12;

            // Use a barrier with a participant count that is one more than the
            // the number of threads. The extra one is for the main thread,
            // which is used to signal the start of the race.

            using (Barrier barrier = new Barrier(numberOfHorses + 1))
            {
                var horsesThreads = new Thread[numberOfHorses];

                for (int i = 0; i < numberOfHorses; i++)
                {
                    int horseNumber = i;
                    horsesThreads[i] = new Thread(() => runRace(horseNumber, barrier));
                    horsesThreads[i].Start();
                }

                Console.WriteLine("Press <RETURN> to start the race!");
                Console.ReadLine();

                // Signals the start of the race. None of the threads that called
                // SignalAndWait() will return from the call until *all* the 
                // participants have signalled the barrier.

                barrier.SignalAndWait();

                Console.WriteLine("Race started!");
                Console.ReadLine();
            }
        }

        private static void runRace(int horseNumber, Barrier barrier)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Horse " + horseNumber + " is waiting to start.");
            barrier.SignalAndWait();
            Console.WriteLine("Horse " + horseNumber + " has started.");
        }

        private static void Main()
        {
            new Program().run();
        }
    }
}

[EDIT] I just noticed that Henk already mentioned Barrier, but I'll leave this answer here because it has some sample code.

share|improve this answer

Threading does not promise fairness or deterministic results, so it's not a good way to simulate a race.

Having said that, there are some sync objects that might do what you ask. I think the Barrier class (Fx 4+) is what you want.

share|improve this answer
    
This small app is an exercise I've found on the internet, and it specifically instructs me to set a single thread for each horse. The code may remain as it is now, It just seems to me that if a thread starts working before all of it's parallels have been created, the app fails to simulate an actual race. – AdiB Aug 8 '13 at 7:57
    
After fixing that (with Barrier) your app will still "fail to simulate an actual race". But for an exercise it's OK. – Henk Holterman Aug 8 '13 at 8:00

I'd be looking at a ManualResetEvent as a gate; inside the Thread, decrement a counter; if it is still non-zero, wait on the gate; otherwise, open the gate. Basically:

using System;    
using System.Threading;
class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        ManualResetEvent gate = new ManualResetEvent(false);
        int numberOfThreads = 10, pending = numberOfThreads;
        Thread[] threads = new Thread[numberOfThreads];
        ParameterizedThreadStart work = name =>
        {
            Console.WriteLine("{0} approaches the tape", name);
            if (Interlocked.Decrement(ref pending) == 0)
            {
                Console.WriteLine("And they're off!");
                gate.Set();
            }
            else gate.WaitOne();
            Race();
            Console.WriteLine("{0} crosses the line", name);
        };
        for (int i = 0; i < numberOfThreads; i++)
        {
            threads[i] = new Thread(work);
            threads[i].Start(i);
        }
        for (int i = 0; i < numberOfThreads; i++)
        {
            threads[i].Join();
        }
        Console.WriteLine("all done");

    }
    static readonly Random rand = new Random();
    static void Race()
    {
        int time;
        lock (rand)
        {
            time = rand.Next(500,1000);
        }
        Thread.Sleep(time);
    }

}
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