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I'm writing a program that has multiple encoding schemes and one of them is a prime shift, based on whither the key is even or odd. The decoding scheme is as follows ::

The key is checked to see whether it is odd or even. For an odd key, odd numbered characters are in order first in the new string, then all even indexes. If the key is even all even indexes are first, then all the odd indexes

So for string "abcdefg" and a key of 27 the new string should be "bdfaceg" if the key was 28 the new string should be "acegbdf"

Oddly enough if the key is odd, and the String length is odd or even, it decodes perfectly. if the key is even and the String length is even it will decode fine,

But if the key is even and the String length is odd it will not decode right.

Using the test String "Enter Message Here." these are my out puts::

Encoded Key = 28 ; Encoded Message "EtrMsaehr.ne esg ee" Message length = 19
Decoded Key = 28 ; Decoded Message "E.tnreM seasegh renull"

So the even entries are in the right place, but the odd ones either need to be pulled inversely or pushed back by on odd index, I think... I think pushing them back an index would be easiest, but I'm still fairly new to Java and I don't know how to do that.

Here is the code for the function I am using at this instance.

protected String decode(String a, int k)
{
    System.out.println(a.length());
    String[] out = new String [a.length()];
    String decode = a;
    int key = k;
    boolean kP = IsEven(key);
    String odd = "";

    if (kP)
    {
        //Key is even
        try
        {
            int f = 0;
            for (int i =0 ; i<(a.length()/2); i++)
            {
                out[f] = Character.toString(a.charAt(i));
                f+=2;
            }
            int g = 1;
            for (int i = (a.length()/2) ; i<(a.length()); i++)
            {
                out[g] = Character.toString(a.charAt(i));
                g+=2;
            }
        }
        catch ( IndexOutOfBoundsException e )
        {
            System.out.println("Out of bounds");
            while(true)
                break;
        }
    }
    else
    {
        //key is odd
        try
        {
            int f = 1;
            for (int i =0 ; i<(a.length()/2); i++)
            {
                    out[f] = Character.toString(a.charAt(i));
                    f+=2;
            }

            int g = 0;
            for (int i = (a.length()/2) ; i<(a.length()); i++)
            {
                    out[g] = Character.toString(a.charAt(i));
                    g+=2;
            }
        }
        catch ( IndexOutOfBoundsException e )
        {
            System.out.println("Out of bounds");
            while(true)
                break;
        }
    }
    for (int i = 0 ; i<a.length(); i++)
            odd += out[i];
        System.out.println(odd);
    return(odd);
}
share|improve this question
up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your problem is that when it's an even key and an odd string, there will be one more character in the first "sequence" of the encoded string, and you don't account for this:

if the key was 28 the new string should be "acegbdf"

Above example has 4 characters first, then 3 characters last.

In your code you're running to (a.length()/2) which in the above string is 3, and that means you work with index 0, 1, and 2. When what you really wanted was to work with 0, 1, 2, and 3 ("aceg").

The solution is to add 1 to the condition in both your for loops for the even key... THIS WILL ALSO SOLVE THE OUTOFBOUNDSEXCEPTION YOU FAILED TO TELL US ABOUT!

Just a cautionary note: I believe my "solution" will cause your even length strings to fail, but it's not my job to do your homework. :)

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, I didn't even think of that. Also it's not a problem, it's just a catch all; if it does run out of bounds that means that it's done. It shouldn't ever happen, but it's just there in case. I'm used to working with hardware so it's kind of a mindset I have from that. – Tyberius Seppala Aug 8 '13 at 12:47

Step through your code, even by hand, for some simple examples:

  • Key: 2; String: "A"

  • Key: 2; String: "AB"

  • Key: 2; String: "ABC"

  • etc.

Check what happens, in detail. When you know what is happening then you can correct the problem.

share|improve this answer

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