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This pointer has the type of ClassName in non-const member functions.

 class Base
 {
   public:
     void get()
     {
       //this->put(); Why can't I call back a derived class method eventhough 
                       **this** is pointing to derived class object.
     }
 };

 class derived: public Base
 {
   public:
   void put()
   {
    // do somthing.
   }
 };

 int main()
 {
  derived d;
  //d.get();
  d.put();
  return 0;
 }

If I print the value of this pointer in both the functions it is same, indicating that it is called for a derived class object. And also this pointers type is derived * here.

Also as I understand If you have a pointer to object when you're calling a method of it then you're just pointing to the offset where the method is present in the whole object layout starting from the address present in that pointer to object.

But why can't I offset to the derived class method when I have the start address of the (derived)object in base class method.

I am unbale to get it why I can't do this because of the above understanding. I am missing something which is very basic here.

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1  
What should that thing do if it isnt actually pointing to a derived? it hast to compile in every case –  PlasmaHH Aug 8 '13 at 13:03
    
Base has no guarunte that anything derived has a method d. What you are probably looking for is polymorphism: AKA all instances of base have a method "put" that are different for each derived class definition. In this case, declare Base as an abstract class by adding virtual void put() = 0; as a definition. Then it will be able to get a different put() for each derivation, but there is a lot more to learn there, so take this as a starting point for more research. –  MadScienceDreams Aug 8 '13 at 13:06
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6 Answers 6

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Me: When the compiler compiles Base::get function, it cannot see Derived::put function.

You : Isn't the Derived::put in the same file? Why can't the compiler see that?

Me: What if there is a Derived1::putttttt defined by somebody 4 years later deriving from Base in another file?

You: mm, maybe I understand.

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Let's imagine you were a compiler for a second. Now you see this class:

class foo
{
    void bar() { this->xyz(); }
};

What do you do? You complain that you have no idea what xyz is, and that it is certainly not a member function of foo. You don't go looking around for other classes and check whether they might derive from foo and declare this function - it only works the other way around.

The other way around means that you have to declare signatures of methods that you want your derived classes to implement:

class foo
{
    void bar() { this->xyz(); }
    virtual void xyz() = 0;
};

Suddenly, this is valid, but now you cannot create an instance of foo anymore: every class with purely virtual methods is an abstract class.

Note however, that this does work for templates:

template <typename T>
class foo
{
    void bar() { t.xyz(); }
    T t;
};

because each template is instantiated at compile time, so you would not look at the above template, but at e.g. foo<xyz_class> which might provide such a function.

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Yes, as I thought so. Thanks. –  Uchia Itachi Aug 8 '13 at 13:11
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You have to declare your method put() as virtual.

class Base
{
public:
     virtual void put() = 0;
     void get()
     {
       //this->put(); Why can't I call back a derived class method eventhough 
                       **this** is pointing to derived class object.
     }
};

class derived: public Base
{
public:
    void put()
    {
    // do somthing.
    }
};

int main()
{
    derived d;
    //d.get();
    d.put();
    return 0;
}
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I know, but was taken back when I thought of this. –  Uchia Itachi Aug 8 '13 at 13:12
    
"taken aback" @UchiaItachi –  bames53 Aug 8 '13 at 13:43
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Class Base doesn't know that you're only going to use it as part of a Derived object; in general, there might be many different derived classes, only one or some of which may have put(). How could Base be compiled then?

When you have a Base pointer to a Derived object, you can cast it to obtain a pointer to Derived, and call the method that way:

Base* b = new Derived;
dynamic_cast<Derived*>(b)-> put();

A class could actually cast this to a derived instance ponter, if needed:

dynamic_cast<Derived*>(this)-> put();
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Consider you have written this->put() method in the base class, During compilation time the compiler checks for put() function in the same class, as you don't have any such, it will show you compile time error.

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The code you posted will not compile because the compiler has no Idea what derived class is while compiling the code for class Base. the this pointer is a pointer that is implicitly passed to every non static member function of a class its how that function can access member attributes of the it's instance. In a Base class member function this has type Base * In a const member function it will have the type const Base *.

Also the this is a non l-value that means you can not assign a value to it.

The following is from the C++ standard about the this pointer:

9.3.2 The this pointer

In the body of a non-static (9.3) member function, the keyword this is a prvalue expression whose value is the address of the object for which the function is called. The type of this in a member function of a class X is X*. If the member function is declared const, the type of this is const X*, if the member function is declared volatile, the type of this is volatile X*, and if the member function is declared const volatile, the type of this is const volatile X*.

Now as for doing what you want to do in your question the following compiles

#include <iostream>
class Base
{
   public:
     void get();
};


class derived: public Base
{
   public:
   void put()
   {
        std::cout << "This is a bad idea" << std::endl;

   }
};


void Base::get()
{
    //compiler knows what dervied class is
    static_cast<derived *>(this)->put();  
}


 int main()
 {
    derived d;
    d.get();

    return 0;
 }

output is : This is a bad idea

I recommend using virtual functions or templates to get the desired behaviour.

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