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Consider the following struct template:

template<typename T>
struct X
{
    X(T t) : t(std::forward<T>(t)) {}

    T t;
};

where T will either be a lvalue-reference (e.g, const int&) or a regular value (e.g, int). The idea is to use lvalue-reference whenever X is constructed from a lvalue, and a regular value when constructed from a rvalue.

Therefore, the following factory functions are defined to create an instance of X with such properties:

template<typename T>
X<const T&>
CreateX(const T& val)
{
    return X<const T&>(val);
}

template<typename T>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_rvalue_reference<T&&>::value, X<T>>::type
CreateX(T&& val)
{
    return X<T>(std::move(val));
}

So far, so good. If we now consider the struct template Y:

template<typename T, typename U>
struct Y
{
    Y(T t, U u) : t(std::forward<T>(t)), u(std::forward<T>(u)) {}

    T t;
    U u;
};

and we decide to make the same analogy as before for X, we end up with these four factory functions:

template<typename T, typename U>
Y<const T&, const U&>
CreateY(const T& t, const U& u)
{
    return Y<const T&, const T&>(t, u);
}

template<typename T, typename U>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_rvalue_reference<T&&>::value, Y<T, const U&>>::type
CreateY(T&& t, const U& u)
{
    return Y<T, const U&>(std::forward<T>(t), u);
}

template<typename T, typename U>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_rvalue_reference<U&&>::value, Y<const T&, U>>::type
CreateY(const T& t, U&& u)
{
    return Y<const T&, U>(t, std::forward<T>(u));
}

template<typename T, typename U>
typename std::enable_if<std::is_rvalue_reference<T&&>::value and std::is_rvalue_reference<U&&>::value, Y<T, U>>::type
CreateY(T&& t, U&& u)
{
    return Y<T, U>(std::forward<T>(t), std::forward<T>(u));
}

Is there an alternative way to obtain the same result, perhaps less verbose? Fortunately my application will not require more than two template data members, but several other classes like Y will be needed, requiring four factory functions for each of them.

share|improve this question
    
template<class T> X<T> make_X(T&& v){ return X<T>{std::forward<T>(v)}; }, no silly SFINAE needed. This works for both lvalues and rvalues. I'd change the constructor to take T&& though, so you don't have an unnecessary move from ctor-parameter to member. – Xeo Aug 8 '13 at 13:13
    
Thanks @Xeo, but this results in non-const lvalue-references when constructed from lvalues, and I would like them to be const lvalue-references. I agree with the use of T&& to avoid extra move. – Allan Aug 8 '13 at 13:16
1  
Then make a simply trait that transform T& -> T const&. Shouldn't be hard. – Xeo Aug 8 '13 at 13:22
    
I think it would be beneficial for me, and others in the future, if you could write an example using your idea and the transformation trait. Thanks once more. – Allan Aug 8 '13 at 13:24
up vote 4 down vote accepted

this results in non-const lvalue-references when constructed from lvalues, and I would like them to be const lvalue-references

You can write a simple trait that transforms the lvalue references:

template<class T>
struct transform_parameter{ using type = T; };

template<class T>
struct transform_parameter<T&>{ using type = T const&; };

template<class T>
using TransformParameter = typename transform_parameter<T>::type;

And apply that for all relevant template parameters:

template<class T>
X<TransformParameter<T>> make_X(T&& v){
  return {std::forward<T>(v)};
}

I also used a braced-init-list (aka uniform initialization) here to save me from writing the type twice.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks @Xeo. Not that your solution isn't good enough, but trying to explore more the dark corners of C++11, why this does not work: template<typename T> using TransformParameter = typename std::conditional<std::is_rvalue_reference<T&&>::value, T, typename std::add_const<T>::type>? – Allan Aug 8 '13 at 13:51
    
@Allan: If T is X& for example, the add_const results in X& const, and since you can't const-qualify a reference, it's just dropped. – Xeo Aug 8 '13 at 13:54
    
Is there an alternative using std::conditional and any other constructs available in the standard library? – Allan Aug 8 '13 at 13:55
    
@Allan: Yes, but it's kinda long-winded: typename std::conditional<std::is_lvalue_reference<T>::value, typename std::remove_reference<T>::type const&, T>::type, basically removing the reference first, and then adding const and the reference back. – Xeo Aug 8 '13 at 14:03
    
What about: template<typename T> using TransformParameter = typename std::conditional<std::is_rvalue_reference<T&&>::value, T, const T&>::type;? Is it equivalent? I got it working somehow. – Allan Aug 8 '13 at 14:03

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