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I'm trying to get to grips with Lazy Evaluation of an enumerator using Ruby 1.9. This is work in progress so will probably have other bugs/missing code but I have one specific problem right now. I'm trying to pass this test (note I cannot change the test):

def test_enumerating_with_a_single_enumerator
  enumerator = SomeClass.new(some_infinite_sequence.to_enum)
  assert_equal [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], enumerator.take(5)
end

I've written this code below and I know the problem is that I'm calling the lazy_select instance method from the SomeClass on the argument from the initialize method which is an instance of the Enumerator class, so I get a NoMethodError. Any suggestions? Thank you.

class SomeClass < Enumerator

  def initialize(*enumerators)
    super() do |yielder|
      enumerators.each do |enumerator|
        enumerator.lazy_select { |yielder, first_value, second_value| yielder.yield first_value if (first_value <=> second_value) <= 0 }
        .first(20)
      end
    end
  end

  def lazy_select(&block)
    self.class.new do |yielder|
      each_cons(2) do |first_value, second_value|
        block.call(yielder, first_value, second_value)
      end
    end
  end
end
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Why not switch to Ruby 2.0? It does not make sense to stick to 1.9. –  sawa Aug 8 '13 at 13:51
    
I know, but in this case I can't switch. –  ahazoury Aug 8 '13 at 13:55
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2 Answers

I have one specific problem right now. I'm trying to pass this test (note I cannot change the test):

def test_enumerating_with_a_single_enumerator
  enumerator = SomeClass.new(some_infinite_sequence.to_enum)
  assert_equal [1, 2, 3, 4, 5], enumerator.take(5)
end
class SomeClass < Enumerator

  def initialize(enum, &block)
    super() do |y|
      begin
        enum.each do |val|
          if block
            block.call(y, val)  #while initializing sc2 in Line B execution takes this branch
          else
            y << val  #while initializing sc1 from Line A execution halts here
          end         
        end
      rescue StopIteration
      end

    end
  end

  def lazy_take(n)
    taken = 0

    SomeClass.new(self) do |y, val|  #Line B
      if taken < n
        y << val
        taken += 1
      else
        raise StopIteration
      end
    end
  end

  def take(n)
    lazy_take(n).to_a
  end
end

sc1 = SomeClass.new( (1..6).cycle )   #Line A
p sc1.take(10)

--output:--
[1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 1, 2, 3, 4]

sc2 is the name I'm giving to the anonymous instance created inside lazy_take().

The code is very difficult to understand. The code sets things up so that sc1's enumerator is cycle, and sc2's enumerator is sc1 (initialize() requires that the first arg be an Enumerator). When sc1 is initialized, the code starts stepping through the values in cycle and halts at this line:

y << val

Then when lazy_take() is called, sc2 is created, and its initialization code starts stepping through the values in sc1. But there are no values in sc1, so sc1 executes the line:

y << val

to inject a value from cycle into sc1's yielder. Then sc1's yielder immediately yields the val to sc2--because in sc2's code the each() method is demanding a value from sc1. sc2 then takes val and injects it into sc2's yielder. Then the next iteration of the each block in sc2 takes place, and once again sc2's code demands a value from sc1. sc2 repeatedly demands a value from sc1, which causes sc1 to pass on a value retrieved from cycle. Once sc2 runs the loop n times, it stops demanding values from sc1. The next step is to make sc2 give up the values in it's yielder.

If you prefer, you can define initialize() like this:

def initialize(enum)
    super() do |y|
      begin
        enum.each do |val|
          if block_given?
            yield y, val  #while initializing sc2 in Line B execution takes this branch
          else
            y << val  #while initializing sc1 from Line A execution halts here
          end         
        end
      rescue StopIteration
      end

    end
  end

That shows that you do not have to specify a block parameter and explicitly call() the block. Instead, you can dispense with the block parameter and call yield(), and the values will be sent to the block automatically.

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Thanks you for your help. It was very helpful in trying to come up with something on my own, which I've posted below. Best, –  ahazoury Aug 9 '13 at 18:36
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Thanks for the comments received above. They were very helpful. I've managed to solve it as follows:

class SomeClass < Enumerator

  class SomeOtherClass < RuntimeError

    attr_reader :enumerator

    def initialize(enumerator)
      @enumerator = enumerator
    end
  end


  def initialize(*enumerators)
    super() do |yielder|
      values = []
      enumerators.each do |enumerator|
        values.push lazy_select(enumerator) { |value| sorted? enumerator }.take(@number_to_take)
      end
      values.flatten.sort.each { |value| yielder.yield value }
    end
  end

  def lazy_select(enumerator, &block)
    Enumerator.new do |yielder|
      enumerator.each do |value|
        yielder.yield value if block.call enumerator
      end
    end
  end

  def sorted?(enumerator)
    sorted = enumerator.each_cons(2).take(@number_to_take).all? { |value_pair| compare value_pair }
    sorted || raise(SomeClass::SomeOtherClass, enumerator)
  end

  def compare(pair)
    pair.first <= pair.last
  end

  def take(n)
    @number_to_take = n
    super
  end
end

This passes all my tests.

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