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I had written erroneous piece of code, which crashed only after multiple runs in release mode in visual studio (greater than 50). Can someone explain why this piece of code didn't crash much earlier

char *pcBuffer= "Some Text";
char *pctempBuff = NULL;

    pctempBuff = malloc(100);
    memset(pctempBuff,0,100);
    memcpy(pctempBuff,pcBuffer,100);

The above code crashed after multiple runs.

I corrected it to the following code which is correct and it no longer crashes

char *pcBuffer= "Some Text";
char *pctempBuff = NULL;

pctempBuff = malloc(strlen(pcBuffer)+1);
memset(pctempBuff,0,strlen(pcBuffer)+1);
memcpy(pctempBuff,pcBuffer,strlen(pcBuffer)+1);
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What's the whole program? does the program image get loaded again after each malloc, or are you mallocing in the same program instance? –  Magn3s1um Aug 8 '13 at 14:15
    
There's generally not much point in discussing an incorrect program, since no deterministic behaviour is required. –  Kerrek SB Aug 8 '13 at 14:17
    
@Magn3s1um This is part of a huge program. Fixing this resolved my issue. I just wanted to know why it causes crash after long time only. –  user1692342 Aug 8 '13 at 14:19
    
@KerrekSB I just wanted to have better understanding on why it crashed after long time :) –  user1692342 Aug 8 '13 at 14:19

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted

There are two errors in your initial code.

malloc can fail, returning NULL in low memory. If you keep allocating memory without freeing any, the system will eventually run out of memory and malloc will return NULL. You need to test for this

pctempBuff = malloc(100);
if (pctempBuff != NULL) {
    memset(pctempBuff,0,100);
    memcpy(pctempBuff,pcBuffer,strlen(pcBuffer)+1);
}

You were also reading memory you didn't own by telling memcpy to copy 100 bytes from the address of the 10 byte pcBuffer. This results in undefined behaviour. A crash after many apparently successful iterations would be a possible (if unlikely) instance of this. Your second example is correct because it only reads the memory for pcBuffer.

Since you're copying a string, you could do this more clearly/easily/safely by using strcpy

pctempBuff = malloc(100);
if (pctempBuff != NULL) {
    strcpy(pctempBuff,pcBuffer);
}
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If we try to memcpy 100 bytes from 10 bytes of pcBuffer, it is undefined error? It means it may copy some junk 90 bytes or it may not do anything wrong as well right? –  user1692342 Aug 8 '13 at 14:22
1  
@user1692342 By the standard it is undefined which means you can not predict the result at all. –  Shafik Yaghmour Aug 8 '13 at 14:26
    
@user1692342 Copying 90 bytes of unpredictable content is the best you could hope for. Attempting to do this may appear to work some times only to crash the next time you try. –  simonc Aug 8 '13 at 14:28

You are reading past the memory allocated to pcBuffer in the first case, this is undefined behavior, you can make no prediction about the behavior of such a program and in fact it can act well behaved for a long time and may never crash.

This is the most obvious error, you also need to check that malloc does not fail, but since this is only a sample from larger code it is unclear if that is a real problem or just left out code.

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