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This is an extension to the question on returning the rows of a matrix that meet a condition in R. Say I have the matrix:

       one two three four
 [1,]   1   6    11   16
 [2,]   2   7    12   17
 [3,]   3   8    11   18
 [4,]   4   9    11   19
 [5,]   5  10    15   20
 [6,]   1   6    15   20
 [7,]   5   7    12   20

I want to return all rows, where matrix$two == 7 AND matrix$three == 12 as fast as possible. This is the way I know to do it:

 out <- mat[mat$two == 7,]
 final_out <- out[out$three == 12, ]

There should obviously be a method to get the contents of final_out in a one-liner, something like: final_out <- which(mat$two == 7 && mat$three == 12) that is faster and more succinct than the two line of codes above.

What is the fastest R code to return this multiple condition matrix query?

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4 Answers 4

up vote 9 down vote accepted

Just use [ subsetting with logical comparison...

#  Reproducible data
set.seed(1)
m <- matrix( sample(12,28,repl=T) , 7 , 4 )
     [,1] [,2] [,3] [,4]
[1,]    4    8   10    3
[2,]    5    8    6    8
[3,]    7    1    9    2
[4,]   11    3   12    4
[5,]    3    3    5    5
[6,]   11    9   10    1
[7,]   12    5   12    5


#  Subset according to condition
m[ m[,2] == 3 & m[,3] == 12 , ]
[1] 11  3 12  4
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UPDATE USING MICROBENCHMARK:

Using benchmark gives the opposite answer. It seems the answer given by @SimonO101 provides a slightly faster implementation.

require(microbenchmark)
set.seed(1)
m <- matrix( sample(12,100,repl=T) , 25 , 4 )
colnames(m) <- c("one","two","three","four")

bench1 <- microbenchmark(m[which(m[,'two']==7 & m[,'three'] == 12, arr.ind = TRUE),])
summary(bench1$time)
   Min. 1st Qu.  Median    Mean 3rd Qu.    Max. 
   7700    8750    9449    9688    9800   22400

bench2 <- microbenchmark(m[ m[,2] == 3 & m[,3] == 12 , ])
summary(bench2$time)
   Min. 1st Qu.  Median    Mean 3rd Qu.    Max. 
   6300    7350    7351    7599    8050   15400

OLD ANSWER:

Combining the answers given by @Jiber and @SimonO101 gives a slightly faster answer, at least on my computer.

I made the matrix much larger to separate the computation times.

set.seed(1)
m <- matrix( sample(12,1000000000,repl=T) , 1e8 , 10 )
colnames(m) <- c("one","two","three","four","five","six","seven","eight","nine","ten")

system.time(m[which(m[,'two']==7 & m[,'three'] == 12, arr.ind = TRUE),])
   user  system elapsed 
   6.49    1.58    8.06 
system.time(m[ m[,2] == 3 & m[,3] == 12 , ])
   user  system elapsed 
   8.23    1.29    9.52 

This obviously assumes the matrix columns are named.

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You should use library(microbenchmark) for calculating times...it's much more reliable. –  Thomas Aug 8 '13 at 15:04
    
@Thomas thanks for the tip. This was my first attempt at benchmarking. I will update the answer after I install the package. –  dayne Aug 8 '13 at 15:08
    
It can take a little while...look around SO, you'll see other examples of how people use it. –  Thomas Aug 8 '13 at 15:32
    
@Thomas See update. I hope I did that correctly. –  dayne Aug 8 '13 at 15:50
    
No need to store and then summarize. But looks good. –  Thomas Aug 8 '13 at 15:58

Use which with arr.ind=TRUE as in:

> mat[which(mat[,"two"]==7 & mat[,"three"] == 12, arr.ind = TRUE),]
  one two three four
2   2   7    12   17
7   5   7    12   20
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Or mat[mat[,"two"] == 7 & mat[,"three"] == 12,] –  Roland Aug 8 '13 at 14:27
    
I had not read fully the question and I hadn't realized that the OP has already used which –  Jilber Aug 8 '13 at 14:30
    
Is the $ sub-setting appropriate for matrices? I get an error. –  dayne Aug 8 '13 at 14:40

the absolute fastest way in R will be ifelse which unlike if allows for vectorized conditionals. You can also cache vectors of conditionals (e.g. isSeven <- mat[, 'two'] == 7) and use/reuse those later.

I don't have a reproducible example here but I would do something like

ifelse(mat[, 'two'] == 7 & mat[, 'three'] == 12, "both", "not both")

You can plop other conditionals in there or have it return anything that will result in a conformable vector.

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I don't think ifelse will be faster than logical subsetting. Afterall, that's exactly what ifelse does internally. –  Roland Aug 8 '13 at 14:33
1  
Ummm, the claim that this is fastest is plain wrong! –  Simon O'Hanlon Aug 8 '13 at 14:34

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