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I'm wondering if we should be tracking node_modules in our repo or doing an npm install when checking out the code?

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up vote 42 down vote accepted

The answer is not so easy as Alberto Zaccagni suggests. If you develop applications (especially enterprise applications), including node_modules in your git repo is viable choice and which alternative you choose depends on your project.

Because he argued very well against node_modules I will concentrate on arguments for them.

Imagine that you have just finished enterprise app and you will have to support it for 3-5 years. You definitely don't want to depend on someone's npm module which can tomorrow disappear and you can't update your app anymore.

Or you have your private modules which are not accessible from internet and you can't build your app on Internet. Or maybe you don't want to depend with your final build on npm service for some reasons.

You can find pros and cons in this Addy Osmani article (although it is about Bower, it is almost the same situation). And I will end with quote from Bower homepage and Addy's article:

“If you aren’t authoring a package that is intended to be consumed by others (e.g., you’re building a web app), you should always check installed packages into source control.”

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I think you're right, This is an enterprise app and I don't want to depend on what happens to an open source project in the future – Tolga E Aug 9 '13 at 15:56
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I agree with this entirely. I don't want our enterprise build system to require an Internet connection to make a successful build because it needs to download dependencies, which hopefully are still around. Thanks. – deadlydog Nov 4 '13 at 16:42
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Another good article illustrating why it's a good idea to track node_modules in the repo if you're deploying an app and not maintaining a package: futurealoof.com/posts/nodemodules-in-git.html – Will Nov 6 '13 at 4:14
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I've changed my mind a bit on this matter, I believe both views have advantages, but what I said is entirely "philosophical", this approach has a more direct impact if, for example, network is not accessible or whatever similar issue. – Alberto Zaccagni Nov 7 '13 at 19:20
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@Alberto Zaccagni I believe you were right the first time. If you're really building an enterprise app, then you should be using enterprise tools. Artifactory and npm-artifactory should be used to protect against projects disappearing from the internet. Even on small projects this is cleaner than having several copies of the same thing checked into source control. – Ted Bigham Sep 13 '14 at 22:11

Modules details are stored in packages.json, that is enough. There's no need to checkin node_modules.

People used to store node_modules in version control to lock dependencies of modules, but with npm shrinkwrap that's not needed anymore.

Another justification for this point, as @ChrisCM wrote in the comment:

Also worth noting, any modules that involve native extensions will not work architecture to architecture, and need to be rebuilt. Providing concrete justification for NOT including them in the repo.

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Simple, and to the point +1. Also worth noting, any modules that involve native extensions will not work architecture to architecture, and need to be rebuilt. Providing concrete justification for NOT including them in the repo. – ChrisCM Aug 8 '13 at 14:58
    
Not really, this is justification for using a reproducible dev environment using e.g. vagrant. It should only need to work on one architecture. – Robin Smith Sep 18 '15 at 12:50

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