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I've a problem selecting some values that I've simplefied into the samples below. Basically, I have a table like this:

CREATE TABLE sample_table
(
  pk_id        NUMBER,
  business_id  NUMBER
)

Now some business_id's in this table are duplicates, and I need to know the pk's of those records.

Let's assume I (further) build up and fill the table like this:

ALTER TABLE sample_table ADD (
  CONSTRAINT sample_table_PK
 PRIMARY KEY
 (pk_id));

 create sequence sample_sequence;

 create trigger sample_trigger before insert on sample_table for each row 
 begin
    :new.pk_id := sample_sequence.nextval; 
 end;


 insert into sample_table (business_id) values (1000);
 insert into sample_table (business_id) values (1001);
 insert into sample_table (business_id) values (1002);
 insert into sample_table (business_id) values (1003);
 insert into sample_table (business_id) values (1003);
 insert into sample_table (business_id) values (1004);

Now figuring out what business_id's are duplicate is easy:

  SELECT   business_id, COUNT (business_id)
    FROM   sample_table
GROUP BY   business_id
  HAVING   COUNT (business_id) > 1;

but I do not want the business_id's, I want the pk_id's.

I can get them using the above query as a subquery:

select * from sample_table where business_id in (
  SELECT   business_id
    FROM   sample_table
GROUP BY   business_id
  HAVING   COUNT (business_id) > 1);

or using COUNT ( * ) OVER PARTITION BY with subquery factoring

with q as 
(SELECT   business_id, COUNT ( * ) OVER (PARTITION BY business_id) totalcount
  FROM   sample_table)
select * from q
where q.totalcount > 1

but both of them make my query pretty slow (the one for this sample work ok, but when I work with production data of about 500.000 rows, the performance is not that great) so I was wondering if there's any nicer way to do this.

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2 Answers 2

As it stands with the table and just the PK index, the first query:

SELECT * from sample_table where business_id in (
  SELECT   business_id
    FROM   sample_table
GROUP BY   business_id
  HAVING   COUNT (business_id) > 1);

will need to do a full table scan to evaluate the subquery and then the main query will also need to a full scan given the list of business_ids found (the PK index won't be of any use for this.) You'll see a plan something like this:

-----------------------------------------------...
| Id  | Operation             | Name         | ...
-----------------------------------------------...
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT      |              | ...
|*  1 |  HASH JOIN RIGHT SEMI |              | ...
|   2 |   VIEW                | VW_NSO_1     | ...
|*  3 |    FILTER             |              | ...
|   4 |     HASH GROUP BY     |              | ...
|   5 |      TABLE ACCESS FULL| SAMPLE_TABLE | ...
|   6 |   TABLE ACCESS FULL   | SAMPLE_TABLE | ...
-----------------------------------------------...

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   1 - access("BUSINESS_ID"="BUSINESS_ID")
   3 - filter(COUNT(*)>1)

Throw a unique index on business_id and pk_id (in that order) and you should be able to forgo the 2nd table scan and use the index to look up only the duplicate business_ids. (The first table scan is unavoidable as it has to check all of the rows for possible duplication.) With the composite index, Oracle can look up a business_id and grab the pk_id at the same time without having to jump back over to the table.

-------------------------------------------------...
| Id  | Operation             | Name            |...
-------------------------------------------------...
|   0 | SELECT STATEMENT      |                 |...
|   1 |  NESTED LOOPS         |                 |...
|   2 |   VIEW                | VW_NSO_1        |...
|*  3 |    FILTER             |                 |...
|   4 |     HASH GROUP BY     |                 |...
|   5 |      TABLE ACCESS FULL| SAMPLE_TABLE    |...
|*  6 |   INDEX RANGE SCAN    | BUSINESS_ID_IDX |...
-------------------------------------------------...

Predicate Information (identified by operation id):
---------------------------------------------------

   3 - filter(COUNT(*)>1)                          
   6 - access("BUSINESS_ID"="BUSINESS_ID")

This should work pretty good if duplicates are the exception. If, worst case scenario, all business_ids were duplicates, the index lookups could get ugly.

You could try something a bit funkier like this:

SELECT business_id, LISTAGG(pk_id) WITHIN GROUP (ORDER BY pk_id)
FROM sample_table
GROUP BY business_id
HAVING COUNT(*) > 1

Now you just get one full table scan, but now all pk_ids are glued together on the same line.

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There are a couple of ways to do it, I would prefer using a JOIN as this could speed up query

SELECT   
  DISTINCT a.pk_id
FROM   
  sample_table a
  JOIN sample_table b ON ( a.pk_id <> b.pk_id AND a.business_id = b.business_id )

Also, a index on business_id wolud help

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