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This is a problem about efficiency in R. I have two numerical vectors with names attributes, and I want to efficiently assign the values of one vector to the other based on the common names.

For example, the first vector is defined as:

set.seed(1);
a<-rep(NA,10);
names(a)<-1:10;
d<-a;  #  we will need this later 
a

 1  2  3  4  5  6  7  8  9 10 
NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA

and the second vector is defined as:

b<-sample(letters, 5);
names(b)<-sample(1:10, 5);
b

9  10   6   5   1 
"g" "j" "n" "u" "e" 

now the following code does exactly what I want, it looks for all names(b) that are common with names(a) and assigns to those places in a the values of b:

for(p in 1:length(b)){
    a[which(names(a) == names(b)[p])]<-b[p]
};

a

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10 
"e"  NA  NA  NA "u" "n"  NA  NA "g" "j" 

My question is: is there a better more efficient way of doing this? I am dealing with much larger vectors and I keep thinking that there must be a better way of doing this.

A more sophisticated method like:

d[which(names(d) %in% names(b))]<- b
d

1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10 
"g"  NA  NA  NA "j" "n"  NA  NA "u" "e"  

all.equal(a,d)

[1] "4 string mismatches"

produces wrong results because it requires that names(b) and names(a) are ordered first, which also does not seem to be an optimal strategy.

Any ideas would be greatly appreciated!

share|improve this question
    
which is not necessary in your second solution. d[names(d)%in% names(b)]<-b works. –  Metrics Aug 8 '13 at 15:25
    
hmm, for me it does not. It gives me the identical result shown above when which() is included. Notice that it is different than the a after the for-loop. –  fkliron Aug 8 '13 at 15:30
    
If both are named, then, a[names(b)] <- b is sufficient. –  Arun Aug 8 '13 at 15:39
    
@Arun thanks! This is an even better solution! –  fkliron Aug 8 '13 at 15:51
    
See joran's answer when b is not a subset of a as user1609452 notes. –  Arun Aug 8 '13 at 16:24

5 Answers 5

up vote 3 down vote accepted
a[intersect(names(b), names(a))] <- b[intersect(names(b), names(a))]
> a
  1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10 
"e"  NA  NA  NA "u" "n"  NA  NA "g" "j" 
share|improve this answer
    
merci! This did it! –  fkliron Aug 8 '13 at 15:19
    
a[names(b)] <- b should be sufficient. –  Arun Aug 8 '13 at 15:40
    
That will work as long as names(b) is a subset of names(a). –  user1609452 Aug 8 '13 at 15:54
    
Yes, in that case, you just need to subset over the original length of "a". –  Arun Aug 8 '13 at 16:15

1 liner for you:

a[as.integer(names(b))]<-b
share|improve this answer

I would probably just do this:

a[names(b)] <- b
> a
#   1   2   3   4   5   6   7   8   9  10 
# "e"  NA  NA  NA "u" "n"  NA  NA "g" "j" 

If b is not a subset of a, for example:

set.seed(45)
a <- rep(NA, 10)
names(a) <- sample(10)
#  7  3  2  9 10  8  1  5  4  6 
# NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA NA 

b <- sample(letters, 5)
names(b) <- sample(1:15, 5)
#   7  14   2   5   3 
# "j" "w" "h" "k" "z" 

len <- length(a)
a[names(b)] <- b
a[1:len]
#   7   3   2   9  10   8   1   5   4   6 
# "j" "z" "h"  NA  NA  NA  NA "k"  NA  NA 
share|improve this answer
1  
What if the vector names weren't in numeric order? –  Thomas Aug 8 '13 at 15:14
    
@Thomas Good point. Not awake yet. –  joran Aug 8 '13 at 15:18

CORRECT ANSWER:

Based on a comment from @flodel

a[match(names(b), names(a))] <- b

OLD ANSWER:

This gets close. It does not preserve the names of a. I am not sure why. You could reassign the names of a after the fact.

a <- b[match(names(a),names(b))]
share|improve this answer
    
I would worry that b's names may not be a subset of a's. –  user1609452 Aug 8 '13 at 15:22
    
@user1609452 Good point. I still think the match function is worth mentioning. I do like the idea of using intersect though - I had not thought of that for my own coding. –  dayne Aug 8 '13 at 15:26
    
@user1609452. It should not be a concern, since match will return NA and a[NA] <- ... has no effect on a. Now this is just my guess, but I think this approach will be more efficient (faster) than using intersect as I guess that assigning at specified indices is faster than using names. –  flodel Aug 8 '13 at 21:18
    
@flodel It will cause an error see ?'[' (NAs in indexing). –  user1609452 Aug 9 '13 at 1:37
    
@user1609452. Thanks. I had tested with length(b) == 1. With a longer b containing one or more NA, it still does not throw an error but it does have a destructive effect on a. See a <- setNames(c(0, 0), c("A", "B")) and b <- setNames(c(1, 2), c("A", "Z")) for example. Learnt something today! –  flodel Aug 9 '13 at 11:01

Try this:

a[names(a) %in% names(b)] <- b[names(a[names(a) %in% names(b)])]
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