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So when combining strings, oftentimes there are constant components, for example:

std::string s;
s += initial_string;
s += "const string";
s += terminating_string;

That's just a demonstration, string operations can be quite a bit more complex and in-depth. So, when doing the const part, the implementation ends up "not knowing" the length and effectively does a strlen() on it. Clearly this is a waste, as the length is known at compile time. I've tested that replacing the const string part with this is quite a bit faster (substantially more in x64 for whatever reason):

s.append("const string",12);

It's annoying, time-consuming, and error-prone to actually count the characters, so this is a little better:

s.append("const string",sizeof("const string")-1);

That's still somewhat error prone (i.e. change the first part but forget to change the second part) so a macro can help this:

#define strnsizeof(s) s,sizeof(s)-1
s.append(strnsizeof("const string"));

Question 1: Anybody have a better/cleaner solution to this?

I've also got an extended string class where I use the << operator for concatenating strings and various other object types. Similar issue here, this is nice and clean (to me):

s << initial_string << "const string" << terminating_string;

When I have an operator for my own object type (of which length is a component) the append operation is fast and easy, but when it gets the const char * here again, I don't get the length even though it's constant at compile time. So I can speed that up by creating a little structure that takes a const char * and length along the lines of:

s << initial_string
    << MyStr::ConstBuf(strnsizeof("const string"))
    << terminating_string;

Boy is that getting ugly. So I could macro that out too, e.g.:

#define MyStrConst(s) MyStr::ConstBuf(s,sizeof(s)-1)
s << initial_string
    << MyStrConst("const string")
    << terminating_string;

Better but not great.

Question 2: Anybody got a better/cleaner solution than encapsulating the constant string?

share|improve this question
3  
A function that takes the character array by reference would do. – R. Martinho Fernandes Aug 8 '13 at 15:02
1  
Is there something wrong with std::stringstream? – dunc123 Aug 8 '13 at 15:03
2  
@dunc123 When trying to increase performance, everything is wrong with stringstream – Neil Kirk Aug 8 '13 at 15:06
2  
@mark: template<size_t SZ> void fn(char (&arr)[SZ]) { ... } -- size can be accessed in the function via SZ, which is constant expression. The function can be called as fn("const string") -- SZ will be automatically deduced. – Benjamin Lindley Aug 8 '13 at 15:07
2  
... are you very that desperate to make your program faster ? I mean, STL is designed for its ease of use, if you want speed, why don't you just use char* ? – Uman Aug 8 '13 at 15:12

Comments to the question resulted in a template like the following:

template<size_t SZ> std::string& operator<<( std::string &s, const char(&arr)[SZ] ) {
    s.append( arr, SZ-1 );
    return s;
}

So instead of s += "const string" the template is utilized when doing:

s << "const string"

Additionally, I was able to update my extended string class such that the following utilizes a template to get the constant size as well:

s << initial_string << "const string" << terminating_string;

EDIT: this does not work as expected:

typedef struct { char buffer[32]; } ST;
ST st = { "1234" };
s << st.buffer;  // results in s with size 31!

This can be solved via a non-const template, e.g.:

template<size_t SZ> std::string& operator<<( std::string &s, char(&arr)[SZ] ) {
    s.append( arr ); // NOTE not using SZ here so a strlen happens
    return s;
}

So now:

s << st.buffer;  // results in s with size 4

Except:

const ST cst = &st;
s << cst.buffer;  // results in s with size 31 again...

Same issue when buffer is in a class, as you'd expect.

share|improve this answer
1  
Just make sure that if you release this code for others to use, that you carefully document this behavior. Since passing null terminated strings stored in char arrays that are longer than the string will not have the behavior that people expect. – Benjamin Lindley Aug 8 '13 at 16:26
    
Yes indeed, something I discovered when at first I didn't have the -1 in the append. Also the const part of the arr parameter was necessary... – mark Aug 8 '13 at 16:31
    
More to your point, places I have an object member char value[Max_Len+1] so that value doesn't require additional heap allocation beyond the parent object now utilize the template and appends the entire Max_Len regardless of how much of the storage is being used. I can resolve that by creating another template but without the const then using the += operator which goes back to using the strlen. Except when the object itself is const, then it's back to const template... not sure I have a solution for that one... – mark Aug 8 '13 at 17:03

Write to your compiler manufacturer and ask them why they don't optimise for this case. Then, hopefully, they'll add constant string concatenation to the list of optimisations and everyone's code will go faster without having to do anything!

That would be my favourite solution.

share|improve this answer
    
Agreed. But I was hoping for a solution sometime prior to my retirement. =) – mark Aug 8 '13 at 15:49
    
How did you get to 26.6K reputation with answers like this? (that's rhetorical; your answer is the only one with upvotes...) – Ben Hymers Aug 8 '13 at 16:20
    
Indeed, I would expect a decent compiler with, say, libstdc++'s string first inline the trivial operator+=(p), which just calls append(p). Then it should inline that trivial function, which (a debug check aside) just calls append(p, traits::length(p)). Then it should inline traits::length(p), which is a trivial wrapper around strlen(p) (actually __builtin_strlen, but whatever). And since p is a known constant after all this inlining, the compiler should replace that with the known result. But apparently MSVC isn't smart enough for that. – Sebastian Redl Aug 8 '13 at 16:41
    
sometimes I write constructive answers that take me time to think out, test and write... and other times I just go with the flippant ones. Guess which gets me more upvotes :-) – gbjbaanb Aug 8 '13 at 19:42

What about just:

const std::string const_string("const string");
std::string s;
s += initial_string;
s += const_string;
s += terminating_string;
share|improve this answer
    
Performs reasonably well (but not as well as const/sizeof), and I don't want to pre-declare all my constant strings. Also s += std::string( "const string" ) is going the wrong way performance-wise (kind of surprised that that couldn't be optimized better by the compiler, MSVC2012)... – mark Aug 8 '13 at 15:30

I don't have access to the MSVC compiler. Would reserving a sufficiently large buffer improve the performance?

Something along these lines

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

string fast_concat(string s, const string& terminating_string) {

  static const string const_string("const string");

  s.reserve(s.size() + const_string.size() + terminating_string.size());

  s.append(const_string);

  s.append(terminating_string);

  return s;
}

int main() {

  cout << fast_concat("initial_string, ", ", terminating string") << endl;

}

(I am hoping for moves when capturing the first argument by value and also when returning the result.)

share|improve this answer
    
Pre-reserving string storage does in fact improve performance when assembling a series of known-length strings, but it's a different improvement than the constant concatenation itself (I was specifically trying to remove an unnecessary strlen). – mark Aug 8 '13 at 16:18

Here is how you can get strlen in compile time with a template

#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

template <size_t N>
void concat_char_array(string& s, const char (&array)[N]) {

    s.append(array, N-1);
}

string fast_concat(string s, const string& terminating_string) {

  concat_char_array(s, "const string");

  s.append(terminating_string);

  return s;
}

int main() {

  cout << fast_concat("initial string, ", ", terminating string") << endl;

}

It should be just as fast as it is with macros.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, I just noticed that others had suggested it as well... – Ali Aug 8 '13 at 16:24

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