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Suppose I have

template<class T>
void f(T t);

and

template<class T>
class X
{   
};

If I want only f<T> to be friend of X<T>, I declare:

template<class T>
class X
{
    friend void f<>(T t);
};

Now suppose f is declared like this:

template<class T, class U>
void f(T t, U u);

I want to declare the following: for any type U f<T, U> is friend of X<T>. So I want f<int, char> to be friend of X<int>, but I don't want f<char, int> to be frient of X<int>. Is this possible? The following doesn't seem to compile

template<class T>
class X
{
    template <class U>  
    friend void f<>(T t, U, u);
};

Please note that I'm aware how to declare the whole template as friend.

share|improve this question
    
That would involve a partial function template specialization of some kind. And since those are not allowed, I doubt this is possible. – jrok Aug 8 '13 at 15:24
    
@jrok: That's my suspicion so far. But C++ is full of surprises. I'm hoping someone would come up with the right syntax or prove (by standard) that it's impossible – Armen Tsirunyan Aug 8 '13 at 15:28
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Apparently, there is no way in current C++ to do what I'm after.

share|improve this answer

[EDIT] I had taken this idea from a website which stated this was possible, but not properly tested it. As it turns out, this does not work, so please disregard this suggestion.

As far as I can tell, what OP wants to do is not possible in c++... [/EDIT]

The code as you posted it would partially specialize the function f, however this is not allowed.

To fix it, remove the empty angle brackets from the friend declaration:

template<class T>
class X
{
    template <class U>  
    friend void f(T t, U, u);
};
share|improve this answer
2  
The only way to get a declaration of f in namespace scope in this case is to instantiate some X. That's not what OP wants, I believe. – jrok Aug 8 '13 at 15:48
    
I'm not sure I follow. He just wants to restrict the possible instantiations of f that can be friends of X, depending on the template parameter of X, right? That's what this does. Of course you need to instantiate X to actually know which functions f apply, I thought that was given. – dgel Aug 8 '13 at 15:57
2  
In OP f is already declared in namespace scope. As I understand, they don't wan't to limit to only certain specializations, but just want to befriend some of them. Now, given that, when you instantiate some X, you get another overload of f in namespace scope and the results can be a bit surprising depending on how and where we instantiate X. Take this code for example. Now try to uncomment X<int> x; and try again. The output differs. – jrok Aug 8 '13 at 16:17
2  
Or this one. – jrok Aug 8 '13 at 16:20
1  
-1, you have just declared an unrelated function template – Johannes Schaub - litb Aug 8 '13 at 20:20

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