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is there a best and efficient way to check if array's elements are of the same size?

[[1,2], [3,4], [5]] => false

[[1,2], [3,4], [5,6]] => true

What I've got:

def element_of_same_size?(arr)
  arr.map(&:size).uniq.size == 1
end

Another solution:

def element_of_same_size?(arr)
  arr[1..-1].each do |e|
    if e.size != arr.first.size
      return false
    else
      next
    end
  end
  return true
end

This one will return false immediately when it finds a element is not the same size as the first one.

Is there a best way to do this? (Of course...)

share|improve this question
up vote 13 down vote accepted

What about using the Enumerable#all? method?

def element_of_same_size?(arr)
  arr.all? { |a| a.size == arr.first.size }
end

element_of_same_size?([[1,2], [3,4], [5]])
# => false

element_of_same_size?([[1,2], [3,4], [5, 6]])
# => true
share|improve this answer
    
perfect answer for this question. – AnkitG Aug 8 '13 at 16:01

To deliver one more one-liner:

You can use chunk and one?

[[1,2], [3,4], [7,8], [5,6]].chunk(&:size).one?
share|improve this answer
    
[[1,2], [3,4], [7,8], [5,6,9]].partition(&:size).last.empty? is also true – juanitofatas Aug 8 '13 at 16:15
    
@juanitofatas right, removed it, thanks! chunk and one is more beautiful anyway – Beat Richartz Aug 8 '13 at 16:17
    
the chunk method is reallly slow, more than 1 second to evaluate this 100,000 times (see my answer) – Aaron_H Aug 8 '13 at 16:17
    
@Aaron_H why with me it benchmarks at 26 microseconds – Beat Richartz Aug 8 '13 at 16:18
    
@Aaron_H Ah ok, I see now, 100'000 times. It's actually the Enumerator#one? that's a bit costly, yes. But hey, it's a oneliner, and 2x-4x is not an extreme performance overhead. – Beat Richartz Aug 8 '13 at 16:43

I like toro2k's answer. I just wanted to add the possibility of adding the method to the array class itself and warn you that elements which are not arrays but respond to the size method could still return true. (edit: false if empty array)

class Array
  def same_element_size?
    return false if self.empty?
    sz = self.first.size
    self.all? {|k| k.size==sz}
  end
end

ar  = [[1,2], [3,4], [5]]
ar2 = [[1,2], [3,4], [5,6]]
ar3 = [[1,2], 'hi', [4,5]]

[[], ar, ar2, ar3].each {|array|
  puts "%30s --> %s" % [array.inspect, array.same_element_size?]
}

#                            [] --> false
#         [[1, 2], [3, 4], [5]] --> false
#      [[1, 2], [3, 4], [5, 6]] --> true
#        [[1, 2], "hi", [4, 5]] --> true
share|improve this answer

Just for the fun of it, if extending Array is your choice, you can go for something more flexible, like implementing a same? method:

class Array
  def same? &block
    if block_given?
      f = block.call(first)
      all? {|a| block.call(a) == f}
    else
      all? {|a| a == first }
    end
  end
end

This allows:

[[1,2], [5,6], [8,9]].same?(&:size)

or

[[1,2], [7,8], [5,6], [8,9]].same?(&:max)

or just (by default will compare with ==)

[[1,2], [7,8], [5,6], [8,9]].same?
share|improve this answer

Some benchmarks:

                                  user     system      total        real
  standalone all                0.234000   0.000000   0.234000 (  0.246025)
  class method all              0.234000   0.000000   0.234000 (  0.235024)
  class method transpose        0.920000   0.000000   0.920000 (  0.940094)
  chunk and one?                1.591000   0.000000   1.591000 (  1.610161)

My money is on the class method using Enumerable#all? by toko2k

share|improve this answer
1  
Could you show how you benchmark this? Thanks! – juanitofatas Aug 8 '13 at 16:24

If dealing with an array of non nested arrays, you could test to ensure the matrix is square. It throws recursive arrays out the window but is kind of concise.

require 'matrix'

a1 = [[1,2],[3,4],[5,6]]
a2 = [[1,2,3],[4,5,6]]
a3 = [[1,2],3,4,[5,6]]

Matrix[a1].square? == true
Matrix[a2].square? == true
Matrix[a3].square? == false
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