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This question already has an answer here:

i have declared a variable in the beginning of program. i believe the variable is declared and used within the scope of the program.

double a,u; int i;
for (i = 0; i < 30; i++)
{
    u += (i + 1) * datas[i];
}

i can check the value of u stored via debugging mode but could not use it elsewhere "use of unassigned local variable u" should i use decimal instead? i trued using decimal but since i also used

datas[i-1] = Convert.ToDouble(dataReader["high"]);

somewhere else in the program i dont think there is Convert.toDecimal() available in c#; what is the difference between double and decimal. PS: I have never used decimal before

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marked as duplicate by Jon, Paul Tyng, Antti Haapala, Lin-Art, Eric Brown Aug 8 '13 at 17:33

This question has been asked before and already has an answer. If those answers do not fully address your question, please ask a new question.

3  
You should really make an effort to google these kinds of things first. – tnw Aug 8 '13 at 15:34
9  
@tnw: The question clearly shows that the OP invested time into not only trying to understand what's happening (...via debugging mode...) but also into writing something better than the usual type of "give me teh codes" junk that you see here often. I for one do not believe that not understanding what's going on was for lack of trying. And I certainly don't want to drive away people who may not know much but do show willingness to learn. – Jon Aug 8 '13 at 15:37
4  
@tnw that is not fair to the OP. They did not understand the problem, and therefore had no idea where to start. I think you should learn some manners and stop being so hostile – imulsion Aug 8 '13 at 15:46
4  
@imulson, a good place to start would be typing the exact question title into google/stackoverflow search and reading. Just look at the search results, look at the related questions to the side. Do we need yet another one? This website is getting pathetic, far too tolerant of nonsense, repetitive questions. This isn't a forum, this is a Q & A database, and this question and answer already exists. Let's stop spoon-feeding, and stop repeating ourselves. – Anthony Pegram Aug 8 '13 at 15:48
6  
@tnw: My comment was not aiming to change your personal opinion, which is not unreasonable (it would not be aiming to do that even if I did find it unreasonable). It was aiming to provide a counter-argument and hopefully stop the cascade of herd downvotes that would have left another new user thinking that SO is populated exclusively by jerks. – Jon Aug 8 '13 at 15:52
up vote 11 down vote accepted

In C#, the use of uninitialized variables is not allowed. If you do not assign a default value, or use a constructor, the compiler won't know what your value is and therefore cannot use it.

You need to change double a for double a = 0; or double a = new double();. The new double() operation will set the default value to zero, according to this default value table. However, = 0 is the preferred syntax.

As a side note, declaring variables on their own line is also a good practice in C#. So is declaring the loop variable directly in the for statement. I'd also recommend using meaningful variable names (a and u are not obvious for everyone), readability is pretty important.

double a = 0;
double u = 0;

for (int i = 0; i < 30; i++)
{
    u += (i + 1) * datas[i];
}

what is the difference between double and decimal.

decimal is usually used for currency or financial operations because of its greater precision (28-29 digits, compared to 15-16 for double). However, it have a much much smaller range than double. decimal range goes up to 7.9 x 10^28, while double goes up to 1.7 x 10^308.

On the other hand, if you don't need great precision or great range, float would be the best type to use as it is 32-bit (compared to 64 for double).

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4  
+1 for in depth answer and getting into good practices – Saggio Aug 8 '13 at 15:43
1  
+1 for practice !! – A.T. Aug 8 '13 at 15:46
1  
Another good practice would be eliminting 30 – Henk Holterman Aug 8 '13 at 15:49

The variable u has not been assigned a value, and therefore can't be used in a loop. Try this instead:

double a = 0;double u = 0; int i;
for (i = 0; i < 30; i++)
{
    u += (i + 1) * datas[i];
}
share|improve this answer

The variable u is not assigned in the first execution of u += ...
and since u += x; is equivalent to u = u + x; it follows that the compiler will flag this. u does have a default value of 0 but the compiler will not let you use that, it enforces good programming style here.

What you probably want is:

double a, u = 0; 

for (int i = 0; i < datas.Length; i++)
{
    u += (i + 1) * datas[i];
}

You could still run into the same problem for a though.

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3  
This is a rubbish answer. Why do so many people auto upvote users with such high rep? – musefan Aug 8 '13 at 15:33
    
What is the rubbish part? – Henk Holterman Aug 8 '13 at 15:33
    
The useless bit of text you put just so you could be first on the board. No help on it's own... it only becomes useful when you edit more in – musefan Aug 8 '13 at 15:34
2  
@KageRai it's not exclusively for beginners. IMO, this is an OK question, but many won't agree with me – imulsion Aug 8 '13 at 15:37
3  
@KageRai - the criticism here is not aimed at you. And yes SO is for beginners but we do expect some effort in the question. Yours looks OK. – Henk Holterman Aug 8 '13 at 15:38

You need to assign a value to u before you will use it.

double u = 0;

Compiler converts u += 1 to u = u + 1. As you can see, you read u, but haven't assigned a value to this variable. That's why compiler tells that you are using unassigned local variable

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You have never assigned a value to the variable u. change your declaration to...

double u = 0;

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1  
What I should have said was 'you never assigned a value to u' , hence the error "use of unassigned local variable". – recneps Aug 8 '13 at 15:38
1  
why not edit your question rather than leave a comment? :) – imulsion Aug 8 '13 at 16:00

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