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I am new to bit shifting and want to know when to use this shifting ? The method below converts an integer to binary,octal and hexadecimal where "shift" would be 2,3 or 4 and i be any integer.

private static String toUnsignedString(int i, int shift) {
   char[] buf = new char[32];
   int charPos = 32;
   int radix = 1 << shift;
   int mask = radix - 1;
   do {
      buf[--charPos] = digits[i & mask];
      i >>>= shift;
   } while (i != 0);

   return new String(buf, charPos, (32 - charPos));
}

where

final static char[] digits = {
   '0' , '1' , '2' , '3' , '4' , '5' ,
   '6' , '7' , '8' , '9' , 'a' , 'b' ,
   'c' , 'd' , 'e' , 'f' , 'g' , 'h' ,
   'i' , 'j' , 'k' , 'l' , 'm' , 'n' ,
   'o' , 'p' , 'q' , 'r' , 's' , 't' ,
   'u' , 'v' , 'w' , 'x' , 'y' , 'z'
};

I am not able to understand this method . Please explain.

share|improve this question
    
This absolutely does not answer your question but this link might be useful to you : graphics.stanford.edu/~seander/bithacks.html –  Arnaud Denoyelle Aug 8 '13 at 15:34
5  
Did you try stepping through the method (either by hand or with a debugger)? What part don't you understand? –  Ted Hopp Aug 8 '13 at 15:34
1  
(Shifting right == division, shifting left == multiplication) by 2 ^ number of bits shifted. That may help you understand what is actually going on. –  fvu Aug 8 '13 at 15:38
    
@TedHopp thanks for your comment. I am not getting the logic behind the masking and bit shifting –  Achyut Aug 8 '13 at 15:39

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

First, I think that your description of the arguments is wrong. This will generate binary when the argument shift is 1, not 2.

The way it works is that the method first calculates mask to be an int value that is all zero except for the bottom (least significant) shift bits are 1. The loop then repeatedly looks up the digit corresponding to the least significant shift bits of i and then shifts i to the right by shift bits. (The >>>= assignment shifts to the right and fills with zero on the left. If the method had incorrectly used the >>= assignment, it would fill with the sign bit.) The loop stops when i reaches 0. By using a do...while loop instead of a while loop, the method always generates some output, even if i starts as 0.

Perhaps the trickiest part is realizing that the way mask is computed results in exactly the bottom shift bits of mask being set to 1. The expression 1 << shift has the value of 2shift, so mask gets the value 2shift - 1, which is always shift bits of 1.

1 << shift:
   000000...000010  .  .  .  0
                 |<- shift ->|
                     bits
                     all 0
(1 << shift) - 1:
   000000...000001  .  .  .  1
                 |<- shift ->|
                     bits
                     all 1

Here's a simple example with arguments 47 and 3:

radix is set to 8 (1 << 3)
mask is set to 7 (111 in binary)
i starts with binary value of 101111
charPos is set to 32
First loop iteration:
    i & mask is bit pattern 111, which is 7;
    charPos is decremented to 31
    buf[31] is set to the character '7'
    i is set to i >>> 3, or binary 101
Second loop iteration:
    i & mask is 101, which is 5;
    charPos is decremented to 30
    buf[30] is set to the character '5'
    i is set to i >>> 3, which is 0; the loop ends
The method returns the String formed by the (32 - charPos =) 2 characters at buf[30] and buf[31].

Result: the octal representation of 47 is 57.

share|improve this answer
    
Maybe add why that masking trick works ( 1 << n ) - 1 --> number with all 1's in n-1 lsb's –  fvu Aug 8 '13 at 15:43
    
@fvu - Done, along with a simulation of a typical call that perhaps helps with that. –  Ted Hopp Aug 8 '13 at 15:52
    
@TedHopp thanks for the valuable explanation. This explains how this method works.clear. but why we use the lsb to mask with the no. bits so that it matches the array index ? –  Achyut Aug 8 '13 at 16:07
    
@user1682878 because this kind of masking behaves like the modulo operator - number & ( 1 << n ) - 1 == number % ( 1 << n ) ie the result will always satisfy 0 <= result <= ( 1 << n ) - 1 –  fvu Aug 8 '13 at 16:10
    
@user1682878 - and-ing with the lsb mask generates a value between 0 and (2^shift)-1; this then can serve nicely as an index into the digits array. Because the loop generates digits starting with the least significant position, the buf array needs to be filled from the right, which is why charPos starts at 32 and goes down. –  Ted Hopp Aug 8 '13 at 16:11

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