Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I'm finding it extremely frustrating working out how to kill a thread in Racket.

It seems like it's basic enough that it's not explicitly in any guide or documentation (there's stuff which seems related, but I can't understand how to apply it to my situation because it doesn't offer a mental model for how the process works).

Every time I attempt to (kill-thread thread-name), it returns the error that the thread is in fact a procedure. However, starting the same thread works fine.

What am I doing wrong?

Here's my (horrible) code at the current time, I've never worked much with threads before in or out of Racket so this is probably beyond disgusting:

(define game
  (lambda ()
    (let loop ()
      (sleep 2)
      (printf "game running \n")
      (loop))))

(define start (lambda () (thread game)))
(define stop (lambda () (with-handlers
                            ([exn:fail? 
                              (lambda (exn)
                                 (displayln (string-append "Failed to kill main game thread. " (exn-message exn)))
                                #f)])
                          (kill-thread (start)))))

E: I've tried replacing "(start)" with "game", and thunking/unthinking start/stop in various combinations.

share|improve this question
1  
This question is already answered/accepted, so just a few comments. 1. See docs.racket-lang.org/more for more examples of using thread. 2. Also there see the idea of "custodians" to delete threads and other resources. 3. I've written a fair amount of thread code in Racket, and rarely ever used kill-thread. Instead the thread procedure exits to kill itself, or, a custodian makes sure it's killed. That's not to say kill-thread is never good to use, just that you might need it less than you first expect. –  Greg Hendershott Aug 8 '13 at 17:56
    
Thanks for the pointers. So to kill a thread you can just stop the thread procedure (by hook or by crook)? –  James Duval Aug 9 '13 at 9:21
1  
You give a function to thread. When that function returns, the thread is killed. Instead of looping forever, the function might do some work and return. Or it might look for a message in a thread mailbox, a channel or an async-channel that says it should quit (i.e. something asks it to quit rather than killing it). Those are the "polite" ways. To forcibly make it stop, there is kill-thread and also via a custodian. –  Greg Hendershott Aug 9 '13 at 14:54

1 Answer 1

up vote 3 down vote accepted

Right now, you're creating the new thread and deleting it immediately with (kill-thread (start)), while the old one is untouched.

If you only need to keep track of the single main game thread (aka thats the only thing passing through start and stop) you can use set! and a global variable to keep track of the thread:

#lang racket

(define game
  (lambda ()
    (let loop ()
      (sleep 2)
      (printf "game running \n")
      (loop))))

(define GAME-THREAD (void))

(define start (lambda () (set! GAME-THREAD (thread game))))
(define stop (lambda () (with-handlers
                            ([exn:fail? 
                              (lambda (exn)
                                 (displayln (string-append "Failed to kill main game thread. " (exn-message exn)))
                                #f)])
                          (kill-thread GAME-THREAD))))
share|improve this answer
1  
Thank you very much. I cannot upvote because of lack of rep, but this looks like a great solution. –  James Duval Aug 8 '13 at 16:01
1  
No problem. Make sure you see what I just threw edited in at the top, so you can see what was going wrong with the initial approach. –  ಠ_ಠ Aug 8 '13 at 16:03
    
Cheers. I've read it and understand where I went wrong. In response to your point about "only needing to keep track of a single main game thread", (it so happens that for me, it is) does that mean this isn't a scalable solution? Where could I read about a more typical way of starting and stopping threads? –  James Duval Aug 8 '13 at 16:47
1  
You can keep make use of (current-thread), depending on the scope, and you can also store references to threads in lists if necessary. It really depends. You can also use local definitions, once again depending on your implementation. I'll try to find a multi-threading example –  ಠ_ಠ Aug 8 '13 at 17:11

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.