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With the following code:

function cancelChanges() {
    if (datacontext.manager.hasChanges()) {
        return datacontext.manager.rejectChanges();
    } else {
        console.log("No changes to save");
    }
}

If I call it like this:

         cancelChanges()
                .then(function () {
                    console.log("Changes Cancelled");
                })

I get "Object has no method 'then'". If I use saveChanges, it works. Another problem with this is that the else statement is not returning anything so I'll get an error with the .then and .fail calls... how can this be fixed to use promises?

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3 Answers 3

up vote 1 down vote accepted

You can create a promise of your own using the $q service in angular.

 function cancelChanges() {
    var deferred = $q.defer();
    if (datacontext.manager.hasChanges()) {
        datacontext.manager.rejectChanges();
        deferred.resolve("Changes Cancelled");
    } else {
        deferred.reject("No changes to save");
    }
    return deferred.promise;
 }

    cancelChanges()
            .then(function (result) {
                console.log(result);
            })
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Thanks for this - any idea why .then would work off of the deferred.promise, but .fail wouldn't? I'm getting a "no such method" for fail, but then is working. –  RobVious Aug 8 '13 at 17:22
    
The promise returned does not have a success or fail method. You can achieve the same end with then. .then(function(result){ // success }, function(result){ // failed}) –  Jonathan Palumbo Aug 8 '13 at 17:39
    
You have just discovered one of the ways that Angular's $q differs from the richer API of Q.js –  Ward Aug 9 '13 at 8:53

Breeze only returns promises for asynchronous methods. This is by design. But as another poster has pointed out you can always construct a promise from an already realized result.

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Here is a slightly more economical syntax for cancelChanges then Jonathan Palumbo (who has the right idea) proposed:

 function cancelChanges() {
    if (datacontext.manager.hasChanges()) {
        datacontext.manager.rejectChanges();
        return $q.when("Changes Cancelled");
    } 
    return $q.reject("No changes to save");
 }

See API documentation for $q.

P.S.: I'm somewhat mystified why you want the method to fail when there are no changes to cancel rather than return the success path for that as well. And I can't understand why this is an async method. I guess you have your reasons.

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