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I have following issue: I'm parsing file which contains sets which contains atoms (smallest unbreakable information). Basically represented by:

class Atom {
    // Some data
    virtual void Hash(const char *dst); // Calculates checksum of data contained

    int Load(std::istream &stream) {} // Do stuff

};

class Set {
    std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Atom>> atoms;

    // Creates multiple atoms based on data in istream
    int Load(std::istream &stream)
    {
         while(/*...*/){
             Atom *atom = new Atom(); // Here's the problematic line
                                      // And I'd like to replace it by factory.Create()
             atom->Load(istream);
             atoms.push_pack(std::shared_ptr<Atom>(atom));
         }
    }
};

class File {
    std::vector<std::shared_ptr<Set>> sets;

    // Loads multiple Sets from istream
    int Load(std::istream &stream)
    {
         while(/*...*/){
             Set *set = new Set();
             set->Load(istream);
             sets.push_pack(std::shared_ptr<Sets>(set));
         }
    }
};

There are several other classes which are not important. The problem is that I have many different types of atoms (mostly differ in what type of hash they use to generate checksum), co I've got something like this:

class AtomMd5 : public Atom {
   virtual void Hash(const char *dst) {md5(dst, data); }
};

class AtomSha1 : public Atom { /* . . . */ };
class AtomSha256 : public Atom { /* . . . */ };
/* . . . */

And user chooses which Atom type should be used trough whole application. Atom type is set once and is never changed.


Factory pattern

I've decided to solve this using Factory pattern and I'm stuck with it. I want all instances of all classes be aware of which factory is in use, so I've came up with following ideas and I don't really like any of them:

Singleton

This just came to mind and I've killed this idea very quickly. The resulting product is a library which can be used by many threads by one application with different settings. I'd like to use dependency injection.

Neither using templates like Set<class Factory> and File<class Factory> is an option... Some new Atom implementations may come from user (outside library) in the future.


Implementation that would work in php/python, but won't work in C++

class AtomFactory {
    virtual Atom *Create() {return new Atom(); }
};

class AtomMd5Factory {
    virtual Atom *Create() {return static_cast<Atom*>(new AtomMd5()); }
};

/* . . . */
AtomFactory Set::factory; // Added to class
Set::Set(AtomFactory &factory)
{
    factory.Create(); // This would work (quite logical)
    this->factory = factory; // This would create new Factory with V-Table of AtomFactory,
                             // not V-Table of AtomMd5Factory (again expected, but won't
                             // help me)
}

AtomMd5Factory factory;
Set new_set(factory);

Implementation using new

This is the first one I've considered for real application and it's basically the same as previous one except *:

AtomFactory *Set::factory; // Added to class
Set::Set(AtomFactory *factory)
{
    factory->Create(); // This would work
    this->factory = factory; // This would too
}

But I'm not a fan of untraced references to objects on heap and this whole implementation screams for invalid pointer or memory leak.


Implementation using std::shared_ptr

std::shared_ptr<AtomFactory> Set::factory; // Added to class
Set::Set(std::shared_ptr<AtomFactory> &factory)
{
    factory->Create(); // This would work
    this->factory = factory; // This would too
}

But isn't this much overhead? I don't know, it feels like overkill to me.


Container containing just function pointer:

class AtomFactory {
    typedef Atom *(*Callback) ();
    Atom* Create() { return callback(); }

    Callback callback;
};

AtomFactory Set::factory; // Added to class
Set::Set(AtomFactory &factory)
{
    factory.Create(); // This would work
    this->factory = factory; // This would also work
}

So these are my ideas, what do you think? What's your experience? What's the best way to do this?

share|improve this question
    
I want all instances of all classes be aware of which factory is in use - well, what instances and classes are you talking about? You've shown two classes, and nothing about where their instances come from or how they're used, so it's very difficult to say what is suitable. –  Useless Aug 8 '13 at 16:56
    
@Useless ah, I wanted to reduce amount of code to necessary minimum and I found it quite obvious what the code is meant to achieve. I've added Load methods I hope they bring some light to my question, if not so, please ask more question. I want to make it as clear and short as possible. –  Vyktor Aug 8 '13 at 17:04
    
So there are only two places (File::Load and Set::Load) that actually need to know the factory? Just pass it as an argument, then. –  Useless Aug 8 '13 at 17:12
    
If you have an interface whose only purpose is to expose a "call me with zero arguments, and I return something" method (a nullary method), replace it with std::function< return_type() >, which is about as expensive. If it is cheap to copy, or you can make it cheap to copy (under reference, pointer, shared pointer or value semantics), stuff it into the std::function by value. Ie, your factory type is std::function< std::shared_ptr<Atom>() > -- a nullary function that returns shared pointers to Atoms. If you have more requirements, this does not work. –  Yakk Aug 8 '13 at 17:12
    
@Yakk using std::function should work, every other configuration could be provided trough const Set &parent –  Vyktor Aug 8 '13 at 17:18

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