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While reading "The C Programming Language" by Dennis M. Ritchie I came across this line:

For external and static variables, the initializer must be a constant expression.

I am unable to understand what constant expression means here because the below code compiles without any error, isn't the statement: static int a = n-1 , a non constant expression? Please point out what am I missing here. Thanks in advance.

#include<iostream>
using namespace std;

int main()
{   
int n;
cin>>n;

static int a = n-1;

return 0;
}
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6  
This is C++, not C. –  user529758 Aug 8 '13 at 16:54
    
You are missing a manual that is in sync with the version of your compiler. –  Jim Aug 8 '13 at 16:55
2  
@Jim - corrected for you, "You are missing a manual that is in sync with your programming language" –  KevinDTimm Aug 8 '13 at 16:56

3 Answers 3

up vote 4 down vote accepted

It's necessary in C, but not in C++. They are different languages.

The code compiles as C++,

but not as C.


void foo() { this line is here because of stupid restrictions of Stack Overflow }
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Thanks got my mistake! But why does C++ allows it and C doesn't? –  rishabh Aug 8 '13 at 17:00
2  
@rishabh Because Bjarne Stroustrup thinks differently from Dennis Ritchie, and the former thought that lifting the constexpr restriction would be a useful idea, so he designed his language like so. –  user529758 Aug 8 '13 at 17:00

Your code is C++, not C. A very different language. The book's statement is true for C, but not for C++.

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file main.c contents

int main()
{
int n;

static int a = n-1;

return 0;
}

Output of g++ main.c

//Emptiness because it is valid C++

Output of gcc main.c

main.c: In function ‘main’:
main.c:6: error: initializer element is not constant
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