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I'm writing an alternative terminal window (using PySide), and I'm running the shell (bash) using:

subprocess.Popen(['/bin/bash','-i'],....

while setting the various stdio to subprocess.PIPE
I'm also disabling buffering on the output stdio (out,err) using

fcntl(s.fileno(),F_SETFL,os.O_NONBLOCK)

Then I'm using a timer to poll the output io for available data and pull it.

It works fairly well, but I'm getting some strange behavior some of the time. If at a prompt I issue a command (e.g. pwd), I get two distinct possible outputs:

/etc:$ pwd
/etc
/etc:$ 

And the other is

/etc:$ pwd/etc

/etc:$

As if the newline from the command and the rest of the output get swapped. This happens for basically any command, so for ls, for example, the first file appears right after the ls, and an empty line after the last file.
What bugs me is that it is not consistent.

EDIT: Added full code sample

#!/usr/bin/python
from PySide import QtCore
from PySide import QtGui
import fcntl
import os
import subprocess
import sys

class MyTerminal(QtGui.QDialog):
    def __init__(self,parent=None):
        super(MyTerminal,self).__init__(parent)
        startPath=os.path.expanduser('~')
        self.process=subprocess.Popen(['/bin/bash','-i'],cwd=startPath,stdout=subprocess.PIPE,stdin=subprocess.PIPE,stderr=subprocess.PIPE)
        fcntl.fcntl(self.process.stdout.fileno(),fcntl.F_SETFL,os.O_NONBLOCK)
        fcntl.fcntl(self.process.stderr.fileno(),fcntl.F_SETFL,os.O_NONBLOCK)
        self.timer=QtCore.QTimer(self)
        self.connect(self.timer,QtCore.SIGNAL("timeout()"),self.onTimer)
        self.started=False

    def keyPressEvent(self,event):
        text=event.text()
        if len(text)>0:
            if not self.started:
                self.timer.start(10)
                self.started=True
            self.sendKeys(text)
            event.accept()

    def sendKeys(self,text):
        self.process.stdin.write(text)

    def output(self,text):
        sys.stdout.write(text)
        sys.stdout.flush()

    def readOutput(self,io):
        try:
            text=io.read()
            if len(text)>0:
                self.output(text)
        except IOError:
            pass

    def onTimer(self):
        self.readOutput(self.process.stdout)
        self.readOutput(self.process.stderr)

def main():
    app=QtGui.QApplication(sys.argv)
    t=MyTerminal()
    t.show()
    app.exec_()


if __name__=='__main__':
    main()
share|improve this question
    
You're going to have to give us more than 0.5 lines of code if you have any hope of us being able to help. – msw Aug 8 '13 at 17:55
    
You're right of course, that the devil is in the code details. I was trying to create a small code sample that shows the problem, and while doing that, discovered the issue probably lies with synchronizing between stdout and stderr. I'm investigating. – Photon Aug 8 '13 at 19:32
    
Added code sample – Photon Aug 8 '13 at 19:37

After trying to create a small code example to paste (added above), I noticed that the problem arises because of synchronization between the stdout and stderr.
A little bit of searching led me to the following question:
Merging a Python script's subprocess' stdout and stderr while keeping them distinguishable

I tried the first answer there and used the polling method, but this didn't solve things, as I was getting events mixing in the same manner as before.
What solved the problem was the answer by mossman which basically redirected the stderr to the stdout, which in my case is good enough.

share|improve this answer

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