Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free.

I wrote a script to do some rank order correlation calculations on our local cluster. The calculation involves looking two arrays, X and Y of length 5000-10000, and extracting the quantities

all((X[i], Y[i]))
all((X[i], not Y[i]))
all((not X[i], Y[i]))

thousands of times a calculation (because I shuffle X/Y amongst other things).

One of our clusters was running python2.4, so I changed the alls to numpy.alls. However, calculations which I estimated would take ~5-6 hours were hitting the 24+ hour mark. This led me to investigate.

Here is some sample code:

In [2]: import timeit
In [3]: s = """import numpy as np
   ...: x, y = np.random.rand(1000), np.random.rand(1000)
   ...: [all((x[i], y[i])) for i in range(1000)]
   ...: """
In [4]: timeit.timeit(s, number=1000)
Out[4]: 0.39837288856506348

In [5]: s_numpy = """import numpy as np
   ...: x, y = np.random.rand(1000), np.random.rand(1000)
   ...: [np.all((x[i], y[i])) for i in range(1000)]
   ...: """
In [9]: timeit.timeit(s_numpy, number=1000)
Out[9]: 14.641073942184448

Any clue why numpy.all takes 50x longer to compute this? Is it numpy.array overhead?

Edit: My original arrays are not numpy.arrays like they are here (np.random.rand). I wasn't even using numpy at all, until I needed to change the all lines. However, I have replaced my loop with something like

np.sum(np.logical_and(X, Y))
np.sum(np.logical_and(X, np.logical_not(Y)))
np.sum(np.logical_and(np.logical_not(X), Y))

This speed up the running of the initial overhead and the calculation of about 3000 of these loops by 60% or so. Thanks! I'll look for more ways to optimize using numpy.

share|improve this question
    
because you are working with very small lists for the all –  Joran Beasley Aug 8 '13 at 18:44
1  
I'm a little worried that you're not using numpy the way it's meant to be used. On a quick test, x.astype(bool) & y.astype(bool) was 1500x (well, 1468x) faster than [np.all((x[i], y[i])) for i in range(1000)] on your test data. The benefits (apart from nice syntax) of numpy are revealed when you vectorize your operations and have as few for loops as possible. –  DSM Aug 8 '13 at 19:02
1  
np.logical_and(X, Y) is even faster. Generally, if you're working with numpy, and you ever iterate over your array or turn it into a list, you should stop and look for a way to not do that. Vectorized operations are more convenient, thousands of times faster, and generally better in every way. –  user2357112 Aug 8 '13 at 19:08
    
@user2357112: nice, that's another factor of two right there. Depending on where the original code spends its time, it might be possible to speed the total runtime up by an order of magnitude with very little effort. –  DSM Aug 8 '13 at 19:17
    
Thanks, these comments helped me optimize things. See the edit. –  wflynny Aug 8 '13 at 19:50

2 Answers 2

up vote 3 down vote accepted
[np.all((x[i], y[i])) for i in range(1000)]

can be rewritten as

x = []
for i in range(1000):
    x.append(numpy.all((x[i],y[i])))

so you are calling numpy.all on a very small list

numpy methods usually shine on much larger lists

timeit.timeit('all(x)','x = numpy.arange(1,100000)',number=1)
#~.0175
timeit.timeit('numpy.all(x)','x = numpy.arange(1,100000)',number=1)
#~.00043
share|improve this answer

You can make both of these functions faster and more comparable by using generator comprehension instead of list comprehension.

s = """
import numpy as np; 
x, y = np.random.rand(1000),np.random.rand(1000);     
(all((x[i], y[i])) for i in range(1000)) """

timeit.timeit(s,number=1000)
0.05593514442443848

s_yours = """
import numpy as np; 
x, y = np.random.rand(1000),  np.random.rand(1000);
[all((x[i], y[i])) for i in range(1000)] """

timeit.timeit(s_yours,number=1000)
0.3829691410064697


s_numpy = """import numpy as np; 
x, y = np.random.rand(1000), np.random.rand(1000); 
(np.all((x[i], y[i])) for i in range(1000))"""

timeit.timeit(s_numpy,number=1000)
0.06155896186828613

s_your_numpy = """import numpy as np; 
x, y = np.random.rand(1000), np.random.rand(1000); 
[np.all((x[i], y[i])) for i in range(1000)]"""

timeit.timeit(s_your_numpy,number=1000)
12.162676811218262

Numpy may still be slower, but like the guy said, works better on bigger list.

Also, why is

x.all(), y.all() 

not an option?

share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.