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I'm trying to understand the mistake in the following code. The code is supposed to switch between two arrays.

What I saw is that it switches only the first 4 bytes. Is the following correct?

  1. Passing &num1 or num1 is the same (both pass the address of the first element in the array).
  2. The (char**) casting is wrong. That's because when you pass and array you pass the address it's laid in. So you actually pass here a void*.

How can I actually switch between these two arrays only by pointers? Is thatpossible?

I know it is possible if from the beginning I had defined char **num1 and char **num2. But I want it to stay with the array notation!

#include <stdio.h>
void fastSwap (char **i, char **d)
{
    char *t = *d;
    *d = *i;
    *i = t;
}
int main ()
{
    char num1[] = "hello";
    char num2[] = "class";
    fastSwap ((char**)&num1,(char**)&num2);
    printf ("%s\n",num1);
    printf ("%s\n",num2);
    return 0;
}
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As a side note, try to avoid using one letter variable names, it makes the code harder to read. –  Étienne Aug 8 '13 at 20:11
    
But I want it to stay with the array notation! Why? The fact that you're using arrays instead of pointers is the root of your problem. –  Caleb Aug 8 '13 at 20:17
    
Just reading your title, I suggest reading section 6 of the comp.lang.c FAQ. –  Keith Thompson Aug 8 '13 at 20:23

2 Answers 2

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Passing &num1 or num1 is the same (both pass the address of the first element in the array). Am I correct?

No. The first one is a pointer to the array itself (of type char (*)[6]), whereas in the second case, you have a pointer to the first element (of type char *; an array decays into a pointer to its first element when passed to a function).

The (char*) casting is wrong

Indeed, you are casting a char (*)[6] to a char **.

So you actualy pass here a void (Am i correct?).

No. Non sequitur. I don't see how the void type is relevant here. You have pointers, arrays, and eventually pointers to arrays.


Arrays are not pointers. Your code is trying to swap arrays, which does not make sense, since assignment to arrays is not permitted. What you probably want is

I. either get pointers to the first character of each string, and then swap the pointers themselves, like this:

void swap_pointers(const char **a, const char **b)
{
    const char *tmp = *b;
    *b = *a;
    *a = tmp;
}

const char *p1 = "hello";
const char *p2 = "world";
swap_pointers(&p1, &p2);

II. Or use actual arrays, and you swap their contents:

void swap_contents(char *a, char *b, size_t n)
{
    for (size_t i = 0; i < n; i++) {
        char tmp = a[i];
        a[i] = b[i];
        b[i] = tmp;
    }
}

char a1[] = "hello";
char a2[] = "world";
swap_contents(a1, a2, strlen(a1));

Also, you may want to read this.

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Thank you very much for the comprehensive answer. But is there no way to just take the block of bytes that num1 is laid in, and swap this whole block with the whole block of num2 (without a loop) ? How come ? Cause It sounds a very trivial operation. –  Kaka Maka Aug 8 '13 at 20:21
    
@KakaMaka No. It's a basic algorithmic question. You can't read and write an entire array in O(1) time. Just like there's no real O(n) sorting algorithm, etc. –  user529758 Aug 8 '13 at 20:22
    
Got it. Thanks ! –  Kaka Maka Aug 8 '13 at 20:32
1. Passing &num1 or num1 is the same (both pass the address of the first element in the array)

Not true, &num1 gives you a pointer to a pointer that points to the entire character string "hello" (char*[6]) while num1 is just a pointer to the character block "hello" (char[6]).

2. The (char*) casting is wrong. That's because When you pass and array you pass the address it's laid in. So you actualy pass here a void (Am i correct?).

It is still not a void, it's just a pointer to a character pointer. If it were void, then it would be perfectly valid to do something like void** myVoid = &num1. This will cause a syntax error unless you explicitly typecast your char** to a void** before you assign it.

The problem is your explicit type casting &num1 as a char** which is not correct, it is a char*[6]. But of course, you can't declare a variable as a char*[6] so it can't be used in this way. To fix it you need to declare your num1 and num2 as:

char* num1 = "hello";
char* num2 = "class";

instead and keep everything else the same. In fact, with this change there is no need to typecast your &num1 as a char** because it already is that.

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1  
"&num1 gives you a pointer to a pointer" No. &num1 is a pointer to an array. "while num1 is just a pointer to the character block" No, num1 gets converted to a pointer to a character. –  newacct Aug 10 '13 at 8:03

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