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I was wondering if thrown objects obey the same scope rules in c++ as everything else. Here is an example.

try{
  Error err;
  err.num = 10;
  err.str = "This will be thrown."
  throw err;
}
catch(Error e){
  cout << "Error num is: " << e.num << " error string is: " << e.str << endl;
}

Does that work or does the fact that err was created in the try block stop it from being used in the catch block?

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1  
Yes, that works. You throw "err", the catch block handles "e"; everything you initialized in "err" will be present in "e". –  paulsm4 Aug 8 '13 at 22:51
4  
You're throwing a copy... –  Kerrek SB Aug 8 '13 at 22:52
    
As far I know, the scope of in try declared variables ends at the execution of finally block (That is, after the catch). But I'm not sure –  Manu343726 Aug 8 '13 at 22:54
    
@Manu343726: No, the try block defines a scope, just like any other block. err is only in scope there, not in any associated handler. –  Mike Seymour Aug 8 '13 at 23:06
    
@MikeSeymour thanks a lot –  Manu343726 Aug 9 '13 at 6:27

2 Answers 2

up vote 5 down vote accepted

I was wondering if thrown objects obey the same scope rules in c++ as everything else.

The thrown object itself doesn't have a scope, since scopes only apply to names and it doesn't have a name. It has a slightly special lifetime: it is constructed somewhere by the throw statement, and then destroyed once the exception has been handled. In this case, the thrown object is a copy of err. Also, since you catch by value, the caught object e is a copy of the thrown object, not the object itself.

Does that work or does the fact that err was created in the try block stop it from being used in the catch block?

It "works" in that you can access e (a copy of err) in the catch block. You can't access err itself, since that has gone out of scope and been destroyed when the program left the try block; but the copy is still intact until you leave the catch block.

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1  
This is not a 'scope', this is a lifetime. Scopes are delimited by {} and nothing else. There is nothing special about the scope of thrown objects, –  EJP Aug 8 '13 at 23:08
    
@EJP: The object itself doesn't have a scope at all since it doesn't have a name; so the only sensible answer is to describe its lifetime, and the scope of any copies or references to it. But thanks for the feedback; I'll fix the slightly sloppy language of my answer in a minute. –  Mike Seymour Aug 8 '13 at 23:14
    
@EJP: I believe my terminology matches the C++ standard's now. Sorry for any confusion. –  Mike Seymour Aug 8 '13 at 23:17

Yes, that works.

You throw "err", the catch block handles "e"; everything you initialized in "err" will be present in "e".

You can absolutely "catch" any exception you "throw" in your "try" block.

'Hope that helps.

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Without the definition of the Error class, you can't be sure that everything initialized in err will be present in e. –  Benjamin Lindley Aug 8 '13 at 23:07

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