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How do I allow global functions to have access to private members?

The constraints are that you are not allowed to directly friend the global function in the class declaration. The reason is because I do not want the users to have to see all of these global functions in the header file. The functions themselves are defined in implementation files, and I'd like to keep them hidden there as best as possible.

Now you're probably wondering why I have so many of these global functions. To keep it simple, I'm registering various WNDPROC functions with windows as callbacks, and they must be global. Furthermore, they must be able to update information that is otherwise private to various classes.

I have come up with 2 solutions, but both are a bit sticky.

Solution 1. Make all of the members that need back doors protected rather than private. In the implementation file, declare a class changer that inherits from the original class but provides public getters to protected members. When you need protected members, you can simply cast to the changer class:

//Device.h
class Device{
protected:
  std::map<int,int> somethingPrivate;
};

//Device.cpp
DeviceChanger : public Device{
private:
  DeviceChanger(){} //these are not allowed to actually be constructed
public:
  inline std::map<int,int>& getMap(){ return somethingPrivate; }
};

void foo(Device* pDevice){ ((DeviceChanger*)pDevice)->getMap(); }

Of course, users that inherit this class now have access to the protected variables, but it allows me to at least hide most of the important private variables because they can stay private.

This works because DeviceChanger instances have the exact same memory structure as Device, so there aren't any segfaults. Of course, this is creeping into undefined C++ domain since that assumption is compiler dependent, but all compilers that I care about (MSVC and GCC) will not change the memory footprint of each instance unless a new member variable has been added.

Solution 2. In the header file, declare a friend changer class. In the implementation file, define that friend class and use it to grab private members via static functions.

//Device.h
class DeviceChanger;
class Device{
  friend DeviceChanger;
private:
  std::map<int,int> somethingPrivate;
};

//Device.cpp
class DeviceChanger{
public:
  static inline std::map<int,int>& getMap(Device* pDevice){ return pDevice->somethingPrivate; }
};

void foo(Device* pDevice){ DeviceChanger::getMap(pDevice); }

While this does add a friend to all my classes (which is annoying), it is only one friend which can then forward the information to any global functions that need it. Of course, the users could simply define their own DeviceChanger class and freely change any of the private variables themselves now.

Is there a more accepted way to achieve what I want? I realize I'm trying to sneak around C++ class protections, but I really do not want to friend every global function in every class that needs its private members accessed; it is ugly in the header files and not easy enough to add/remove more functions.

EDIT: Using a mixture of Lake and Joel's answers, I came up with an idea that does exactly what I wanted, however it makes the implementations very dirty. Basically, you define a class with various public/private interfaces, but it's actual data is stored as a pointer to a struct. The struct is defined in the cpp file, and therefore all of it's members are public to anything in that cpp file. Even if users define their own version, only the version in the implementation files will be used.

//Device.h
struct _DeviceData;
class Device {
private:
  _DeviceData* dd;
public:
  //there are ways around needing this function, however including 
  //this makes the example far more simple.
  //Users can't do anything with this because they don't know what a _DeviceData is.
  _DeviceData& _getdd(){ return *dd; }

  void api();
};

//Device.cpp
struct _DeviceData* { bool member; };
void foo(Device* pDevice){ pDevice->_getdd().member = true; }

This basically means that each instance of Device is completely empty except for a pointer to some data block, but it lays an interface over accessing the data that the user can use. Of course, the interface is completely implemented in the cpp files.

Additionally, this makes the data so private that not even the user can see the member names and types, but you can still use them in the implementation file freely. Finally, you can inherit from Device and get all of the functionality because the constructor in the implementation file will create a _DeviceData and assign it to the pointer, which gives you all of the api() power. You do have to be more careful about move/copy operations, as well as memory leaks though.

Lake gave me the base of the idea, so I give him credit. Thank you sir!

share|improve this question
    
Are you able to make the data something that you could store a pointer to in the user data area for the window? As in, some combination of pImpl and SetWindowLongPtr? –  Joel Aug 9 '13 at 1:00
1  
How about using pimpl? –  Vaughn Cato Aug 9 '13 at 1:21
    
From preliminary searches of pimpl, it's an interesting concept. I will have to look into it more before I come back with a definitive answer. –  Aggieboy Aug 9 '13 at 1:23
1  
"This works because DeviceChanger instances have the exact same memory structure as Device,": no, it works because undefined behavior sometimes happens to do what you expect. The language definition does not require this to do anything sensible. –  Pete Becker Aug 9 '13 at 1:39
1  
I think you're trying too hard. There's nothing wrong with declaring functions in a header and making them friends. If you write good documentation your users won't be thumbing through headers to figure out how to use your code. –  Pete Becker Aug 9 '13 at 1:40

5 Answers 5

up vote 2 down vote accepted

I usually solve this problem by extracting the application programmer interface in the form of abstract classes, which is the set of types and operations that the application programmer (i.e. the user of your library) will be able to use.

Then, in my implementation, I declare public all methods and types that will be used within my package by other classes.

For example:

  • API: IDevice.h
  • Internal: Device.h Device.cpp

I define the API classes in a way similar to:

class IDevice {
 public:
  // What the api user can do with the device
  virtual void useMe() = 0;
};

Then, in my library (not exposed to user interface):

class Device : public IDevice {
 public:
   void useMe(); // Implementation

   void hiddenToUser(); // Method to use from other classes, but hidden to the user
}

Then, for every header(interface) that is part of the API, i will use the IDevice type instead of the Device type, and when internally i will have to use the Device class, i will just cast the pointer down to Device.

Let's say you need a Screen class that uses the class Device, but is completely hidden to the user (and won't therefore have any API abstract class to implement):

#include "Device.h"
class Screen {
   void doSomethingWithADevice( Device* device );
}

// Screen.cpp
void Screen::doSomethingWithADevice( Device* device ){
   device->hiddenToUser();
}

This way, you don't have to make something private just because you don't want the user to see/use it. You obtain a further layer of abstraction (1 above public) which I call API. You will have:

  1. API // Method/Type visible to the application programmer
  2. public // Method/Type visible to your whole library package, but NOT to the api user
  3. protected // Method/Type visible only to subclasses of the class where it is defined
  4. private // Method/Type local to the defining class

Therefore, you can declare public methods you need to register as callback method, without the user seeing them.

Finally, I deliver the content of API to the user together with the binary, so that the user will have access exactly to what i explicitly defined in the API and nothing else.

share|improve this answer
    
If users can only see IDevice, this means they can't inherit from it and expect any Device functionality right? This is not a requirement, but I just want to make sure I understanding the solution. –  Aggieboy Aug 9 '13 at 1:39
    
If they can only see IDevice, they will inherit no functionality, only the public interface, which will do nothing without an implementing class. This will probably work for you if you don't need to be able to inherit from Device. –  Joel Aug 9 '13 at 1:41
    
@Aggieboy That is correct, the user will not be able to inherit a class internal to your package. If you want to provide inheritance as a way to achieve some kind of callback, you can provide an interface that the USER is expected to implement, and use the interface abstract type in your library to do abstract operations that the user will implement, but this is another type of requirement, therefore i would think about this case as a separated thing. –  Lake Aug 9 '13 at 1:42
    
@Aggieboy As a followup: The user will not be able expect any Device functionality that is not declared also in IDevice. I am assuming that the API is strictly defined as for what the user can/can't do, and won't allow the user to do anything else than s/he is explicitly allowed to do. –  Lake Aug 9 '13 at 1:54

You may be asking a specific coding question, but I'd like to take a step back and examine the reason why you'd want to do this, and the solutions to that.

Breaking abstraction

Are you making a decision based on private state?

class Kettle {
private:
    int temperatureC;
public:
    void SwitchOff();
};

void SwitchOffKettleIfBoiling(Kettle& k) {
    if (k.temperatureC > 100) { // need to examine Kettle private state
        k.SwitchOff();
    }
}

This is relatively bad because the abstraction of Kettle now leaks outside into the SwitchOffKettleIfBoiling function, in the form of coupling to the private temperatureC. This is a bit better:

class Kettle {
private:
    int temperatureC;
public:
    void SwitchOffIfBoiling() {
        if (temperatureC > 100) {
            SwitchOff();
        }
    }
};

void SwitchOffKettleIfBoiling(Kettle& k) {
    k.SwitchOffIfBoiling();
}

This practice is called Tell, don't Ask.

Multiple responsibilities

Sometimes you have data that is clearly related but used in different roles. Look at this example:

class Car {
private:
    int statusFactor;
public:
    void Drive();
};

void DriveSomewhere(Car& c) {
    c.Drive();
    // ...
}
void ShowOffSomething(const Car &c) {
    // How can we access statusFactor, without also exposing it to DriveSomewhere?
}

One way to deal with this is to use interfaces which represent those responsibilities.

class IVehicle {
public:
    virtual void Drive() = 0;
};
class IStatusSymbol {
public:
    virtual int GetStatusFactor() const = 0;
};
class Car : public IVehicle, public IStatusSymbol {
    // ...
};

void DriveSomewhere(IVehicle& v) {
    v.Drive();
    // ...
}
void ShowOffSomething(const IStatusSymbol &s) {
    int status = s.GetStatusFactor();
    // ...
}

This pattern is called the Facade pattern. It's useful for maintaining good abstraction without limiting your implementation.

share|improve this answer
    
I mention slightly in the third paragraph why I need these global functions as they are, but perhaps I should elaborate a bit more. My global WNDPROC receive USB device updates via message pumps in other threads. These global functions are purely implementation details that I want the user to never have to look at, however they must update various private variables within the Device class so that the users can easily read the current status of specific devices. –  Aggieboy Aug 9 '13 at 1:29
    
@Aggieboy in that case, you can use Facades with one user interface and another interface that exposes the private variables. Your users never need to know about the concrete type. –  congusbongus Aug 9 '13 at 1:41

Here's a (very) rough example of pimpl.

 //Device.h
class DeviceImpl;

class Device {
public:
    Device();

private:
  std::unique_ptr<DeviceImpl> pimpl;
};

//Device.cpp
class DeviceImpl {
public:
    friend LRESULT CALLBACK WndProc(HWND, UINT, WPARAM, LPARAM);
private:
    std::map<int,int> somethingPrivate;
};

Device::Device()
    : pimpl(new DeviceImpl)
{
}

LRESULT CALLBACK WndProc(HWND hWnd, UINT msg, WPARAM wParam, LPARAM lParam)
{
    DeviceImpl* pimpl = reinterpret_cast<DeviceImpl*>(GetWindowLongPtr(hWnd, GWLP_USERDATA));

    use(pimpl->somethingPrivate);

    // omitting the SetWindowLongPtr that you have to do before calling GetWindowLongPtr,
    // but the concept is the same - you'd probably do it in WM_CREATE
}
share|improve this answer

Now you're probably wondering why I have so many of these global functions. To keep it simple, I'm registering various WNDPROC functions with windows as callbacks, and they must be global. Furthermore, they must be able to update information that is otherwise private to various classes.

You can use static member functions to do this instead of global functions. Then you can get at the private members just fine. The code would look a bit like this.

class MyClass {
  private:
    std::string some_data;
    static void onEvent( void * user_data );
};

void MyClass::onEvent( void * user_data ) {
  MyClass* obj = (MyClass*)(user_data);
  std::cout<<some_data<<std::endl;
};

...

register_callback( &MyClass::onEvent, &myClassInstance);

The only issue is then the exposing of the onEvent function name. The solution to that is to extract an interface so that none of your private data or functions are exposed (as IMO leaking the private implementation is about as bad as leaking the names of private functions.)

// Header File.
class IMyClass {
  //...
  // public stuff goes here
  //...

};

// Implementation file.
class MyClass : public IMyClass {
  private:
    std::string some_data;
    static void onEvent( void * user_data );
};

void MyClass::onEvent( void * user_data ) {
  MyClass* obj = (MyClass*)(user_data);
  std::cout<<some_data<<std::endl;
};

...

register_callback( &MyClass::onEvent, &myClassInstance);

EDIT: Based on some of the responses to other answers it looks like a viable solution would look more like this.

// IUSBDeviceBackend.h (private)
class IUSBDeviceBackend {
public:
   virtual void update(USBUpdateData data)=0;
   virtual bool resondsTo(USBUpdateCode code)=0
   virtual ~IUSBDeviveBackend() {}
};

// IUSBDeviceUI.h (public)   
class IUSBDeviceUI {
public:
  virtual void showit()=0;
};

// MyDevice.h & MyDevice.cpp (both private)
class MyDevice : public IUSBDeviceBackend, public IUSBDeviceUI {
  void update(USBUpdateData data) { dataMap[data.key]=data.value; }
  bool resondsTo(USBUpdateCode code) { return code==7; }
  void showit(){ ... }
};

// main.cpp
main() {
  std::vector<IUSBDeviceBackedn*> registry;
  MyDevice dev;
  registry.push_back(this);
  set_user_data(&registry);
  // ...
}

void mycallback(void* user_daya) {
  std::vector<IUSBDeviceBackedn>* devices = reinterpret_cast<std::vector<IUSBDeviceBackedn>*>(user_data);

  for(unsigned int i=0; i<devices->size(); ++i) {
    if( (*devices)[i]->resondsTo( data.code ) ) { (*devices)[i]->update(data); }
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
One global function needs to access more than one class's private members, so I can't make it a static member function in any one class. –  Aggieboy Aug 9 '13 at 2:50
    
Sounds like a bit of a mess then - accessing more than one classes internals suggests that something bad/unscalable is happening. Can you show some more "real" code, as there may be other appropriate solutions. –  Michael Anderson Aug 9 '13 at 3:23
    
Well it's more like I'm accessing a class's private variables, as well as it's inner class's private variables. I'd still like to do without it showing up in the header at all though. –  Aggieboy Aug 9 '13 at 5:37

Why not use factory methods to return an interface to your internal class, but still give the globals access to those internal classes? Example:

// IDriver.h public interface:
class IDriver {
  public:
    virtual int getFoo() = 0;
    // ... other public interface methods.

    // The implementation of this method will contain code to return a Driver:
    static IDriver* getDriver();
};

// Driver.h internal interface (available to WNDPROC functions):
class Driver : public IDriver {
  public:
    int getFoo();           // Must provide this in the real Driver.
    void setFoo(int aFoo);  // Provide internal methods that are not in the public interface,
                            // but still available to your WNDPROC functions
}

// In Driver.cc
IDriver* IDriver::getDriver() { return new Driver(); }

Using this approach, IDriver.h would be a well-known public header, but you would only use Driver.h internally in your own code. This approach is well known and used my many existing C+ libraries (such as Java's JNI) to allow access to native low-level bits of your classes, without exposing it to users.

share|improve this answer
    
I think I'm a bit confused; how does this differ from Lake's answer? –  Aggieboy Aug 9 '13 at 1:55
    
It's not that much, I think I did the ol' TLDR on Lake's answer and got straight the point :). If @Lake adds a factory method or mentions the Factory pattern in his answer, I'd be happy to withdraw mine. –  Ogre Psalm33 Aug 9 '13 at 2:00

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