Stack Overflow is a community of 4.7 million programmers, just like you, helping each other.

Join them; it only takes a minute:

Sign up
Join the Stack Overflow community to:
  1. Ask programming questions
  2. Answer and help your peers
  3. Get recognized for your expertise

The following command gives me a list of matching expressions:

grep -f /tmp/list Filename* > /tmp/output

The list file is then parsed and used to search Filename* for the parsed string. The results are then saved to output.

How would I output the parsed string from list in the case where there is no match in Filename*?

Contents of the list file could be:

ABC
BLA
ZZZ
HJK

Example Files:

Filename1:5,ABC,123
Filename2:5,ZZZ,342

Result of Running Command:

BLA
HJK

Stack overflow question 2480584 looks like it may be relevant, through the use of an if statement. However I'm not sure how to output the parsed string to the output file. Would require some type of read line?

TIA,

Mic

share|improve this question
up vote 0 down vote accepted

This makes it:

$ grep -v "$(cat Filename* | cut -d, -f2)" /tmp/list
BLA
HJK

Explanation

$ cat Filename* | cut -d, -f2
ABC
ZZZ

And then grep -v looks for the inverse matching.

share|improve this answer
    
This worked well. I had a 2nd grep statement that I was able to put into the command and it processes very quickly. – user2403711 Aug 15 '13 at 6:19
    
Good to read it works, @user2403711 ! – fedorqui Aug 15 '13 at 8:13

Obviously, grep -f list Filename* gives all matches of patterns from the file list in the files specified by Filename*, i.e.,

Filename1:5,ABC,123
Filename2:5,ZZZ,342

in your example.

By adding the -o (only print matching expression) and -h (do not print filename) flags, we can turn this into:

ABC
ZZZ

Now you want all patterns from list that are not contained in this list, which can be achieved by

grep -f list Filename* -o -h | grep -f /dev/stdin -v list

where the second grep takes it's patterns from the output of the first and by using the -v flag gives all the lines of file list that do not match those patterns.

share|improve this answer
    
I tried the command but wasn't able to get it to work, probably something I am doing wrong. I had an extra grep statement which searches the files for a 2nd parameter (didn't cover this in the question). I wasn't sure of what /dev/stdin is used for. – user2403711 Aug 15 '13 at 6:18
    
-f /dev/stdin is crucial, it makes the second grep read its search patterns from standard input (which is the output of the first grep). – chris Aug 15 '13 at 6:32
    
If you would edit your OP with the extra grep statement you mentioned, I could edit my answer accordingly. – chris Aug 15 '13 at 6:33
    
-oh and especially -f /dev/stdin are neat ideas, thanks. – Ben Challenor Nov 4 '13 at 17:24
    
Though to account for duplicates you should turn that final -v into a -vxF. You're basically doing a set complement/subtraction: catonmat.net/blog/set-operations-in-unix-shell – Ben Challenor Nov 4 '13 at 17:48

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.