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I have a file full of lines like this called logs

19:56:52 12 Nov;Warning;em0;eth0;222.171.89.16;49.137.111.136;ICMP;;
08:35:51 00 Aug;That's odd;em0;eth0;142.53.155.238;252.1.134.24;ICMP;;
11:47:48 21 Jun;Look into this ;em1;eth0;50.219.1.59;56.95.45.60;UDP;16351;15354

and I want to use awk to find the line containing the address I am looking for and rearrange it.

my attempt was

awk '/222.171.89.16/ {print $2,$3,$6,$4,$5,$1}' logs

that just gave me the line because I guess awk needs to be told how to separate the strings so, I tried using FS

awk '/222.171.89.16/ {FS = ";"}; {print $2,$3,$6,$4,$5,$1}' logs

but this only works for some of the lines. Also, I want to say at the beginning that if the ip address came from the 5th column it is outbound and if it came from the 6th column it is inbound. so the data should be in this order. excuse the table which I will also have to do.

TYPE | IFACE   | OFACE   | PROT | SPORT | DPORT |            DATE |
|------+---------+---------+------+-------+-------+-----------------|
| OUT  | em0     | eth0    | ICMP |     0 |     0 | 08:35:51 00 Aug |
| OUT  |         | virbr0  | TCP  | 24760 | 26014 | 07:08:48 18 Feb |
| IN   | em2     |         | ICMP |     0 |     0 | 21:54:43 06 Aug |
| OUT  | virbr0  |         | UDP  | 29450 |  2501 | 00:46:27 04 Aug |
| IN   | virbr0  | eth1    | ICMP |     0 |     0 | 06:29:02 20 Sep |
| IN   | em0     | em0     | ICMP |     0 |     0 | 15:41:37 09 Nov |
| OUT  | eth0    | virbr0  | UDP  | 21879 |  3645 | 13:43:33 11 Nov |
| IN   | em1     | em1     | UDP  |  7699 | 18698 | 06:06:15 12 Oct |
| OUT  | em1     | em0     | ICMP |     0 |     0 | 14:11:09 25 Aug |
| IN   | em2     | em0     | UDP  | 24814 | 31182 | 17:45:57 00 Dec |
| OUT  | eth1    | em1     | UDP  |  4915 | 18665 | 01:49:46 15 Oct |
---------------------------------------------------------------------
share|improve this question

setting FS ist right (default is space character but you need the ';')

If you are looking for an ip address your regular expression should mask the dots.

/222\.171\.89\.16/ .....

If you want to distinguish the field positions you can write (instead of the reg. expression)

 $5=="222.171.89.16"  { print ....}

to match the criteria for outbounds

share|improve this answer

Usually, one defines FS via the -F switch or in the BEGIN clause (as I did below). My sample.awk does not generate the full output, but I guess you can take it as a starting point.

$ awk -v IP=222.171.89.16 -f sample.awk yourfile 
|OUT  |em0  |eth0 |19:56:52 12 Nov|

$ cat sample.awk 
BEGIN {
    FS = ";"    # Field separator

    fmt = "|%-5s|%-5s|%-5s|%-15s|\n"    # Output format

    if (! IP) { # Check if an IP address has been provided
        print "No IP address given! Exiting." > "/dev/stderr"
        exit 1
    }
}

# Test records and print formatted output
$0 ~ IP {
    TYPE = $5 == IP ? "OUT" : "IN"
    printf fmt, TYPE, $3, $4, $1
}
share|improve this answer

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