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This is driving me litterally crazy :

  • Why is the method the_method(self, button) referencing two separate instances of self.button depending on what object calls it?
  • How do I reference an object instance explicitly?

Thank you for your help


import os, stat, time
import gtk

class Lister(object):

    OPEN_IMAGE = gtk.image_new_from_stock(gtk.STOCK_DND_MULTIPLE, gtk.ICON_SIZE_BUTTON)
    CLOSED_IMAGE = gtk.image_new_from_stock(gtk.STOCK_DND, gtk.ICON_SIZE_BUTTON)

    def __init__(self, dname = None):
        filename = "foo"
        self.hbox = gtk.HBox()
        self.button = gtk.Button()
        self.button.set_image(self.OPEN_IMAGE)
        self.button.connect('clicked', self.open_file)
        self.hbox.pack_start(self.button, False)

    def open_file(self, button):
        Buttons().the_method("foo")
        # return


class Buttons(object):

    OPEN_IMAGE = gtk.image_new_from_stock(gtk.STOCK_DND_MULTIPLE, gtk.ICON_SIZE_BUTTON)
    CLOSED_IMAGE = gtk.image_new_from_stock(gtk.STOCK_DND, gtk.ICON_SIZE_BUTTON)


    def __init__(self):

        self.button = gtk.Button() # THIS is the button to modify
        self.hbox = gtk.HBox()
        self.hbox.pack_start(self.button, False)
        self.button.set_image(self.OPEN_IMAGE)

        self.button.connect('clicked', self.the_method)

    def the_method(self, button):
        print vars(self)
        self.button.set_image(self.CLOSED_IMAGE)


class GUI(object):

    def delete_event(self, widget, event, data=None):
        gtk.main_quit()
        return False

    def __init__(self):
        self.window = gtk.Window()
        self.window.set_size_request(300, 600)
        self.window.connect("delete_event", self.delete_event)

        vbox = gtk.VBox()
        vbox.pack_start(Buttons().hbox, False, False, 1)
        vbox.pack_start(Lister().hbox)

        self.window.add(vbox)
        self.window.show_all()
        return

def main():
    gtk.main()

if __name__ == "__main__":
    GUI()
    main()
share|improve this question
    
If I print vars(self) in each of the methods, I can see that the 'play_button': <gtk.Button object at 0x9d1f0a4 (GtkButton at 0x9db7de8)> button's widget ID is definitely different. So how do I get to always refer to the same object (button)? ` –  xaccrocheur Aug 9 '13 at 6:02

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Why is the method the_method(self, button) referencing two separate instances of self.button depending on what object calls it?

It does not depend on the caller: You are explicitly creating a new instance of Buttons every time (e.g. Buttons().hbox creates a new instance and gets the hbox from it).

How do I reference an object instance explicitly?

You already refer to an instance, it's just a new instance every time. These two calls will call the method on the same instance, as expected:

my_buttons = Buttons(); 
my_buttons.the_method();
my_buttons.the_method();

This is the same in every object oriented language, so any OO tutorial could be helpful but http://docs.python.org/tutorial/classes.html may help understand how classes work in python.

share|improve this answer

self.button is referencing to only one and the same object which is the button variable declared in the instance of your listener class.

Prefixing an object with a keyword like "self" is pretty typical in OOP. If you come from C#/java background, you must be aware of "this" or the "Me" keyword if you have ever studied Visual Basic. One thing that distinguishes python is its usage of self keyword in the method definition like:

def the_method(self, button):

Adding self as the first parameter tells python to treat this as an instance method, so that if an object foo exists of your Buttons class, you can straight away call this instance method as:

foo.the_method(xyz)

No need to pass the "self" parameter here while calling. It is just there to make it an instance method. On the other hand if you omit the self parameter, it becomes what you call a static method which is not linked to a particular instance:

def the_method(button):

In that case, without creating a foo instance, you can directly call:

Buttons.the_method(xyz)
share|improve this answer
    
But... this is exactly what I'm doing with Buttons.the_method("foo") and it only does half the job... From what I gather, the_method(self, button) is a callback. And it acts upon the button that called it. Now in order to act upon this very button, but from another method in another class (like my load_file) I have to call that callback, right ? If yes, How can I do that ? Thank you for your patience, Prahlad. –  xaccrocheur Aug 9 '13 at 15:16
    
Nope you are not! Instead of calling Buttons().the_method("foo"), you should say: self.buttonInstance.the_method("foo") - and you should also define the instance variable beforehand like this: self.buttonInstance = Buttons() –  Prahlad Yeri Aug 9 '13 at 16:39
    
I tried that many times, I'm afraid it does not work. In fact, it actually disables the first button. –  xaccrocheur Aug 9 '13 at 16:51
    
I'm curious why are you calling the the_method() at all? Why not just call "self.button.set_image(self.CLOSED_IMAGE)" there itself and be done with? –  Prahlad Yeri Aug 9 '13 at 18:24
    
One call works, the other does not. What actually interests me is the one that does not work, before the one that does. Did you run the code, Prahlad? Did you really understand my problem? –  xaccrocheur Aug 9 '13 at 20:41

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