Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

why is it, that in the following code, n doesn't end up being 0, it's some random number with a magnitude less than 1000000 each time, somtimes even a negative number?

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int n = 0;

    var up = new Thread(() =>
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
            {
                n++;
            }
        });

    up.Start();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
    {
        n--;
    }

    up.Join();

    Console.WriteLine(n);

    Console.ReadLine();
}

Doesn't up.Join() force both for loops to finish before WriteLine is called?

I understand that the local variable is actually part of a class behind the scenes (think it's called a closure), however because the local variable n is actually heap allocated, would that affect n not being 0 each time?

share|improve this question
    
not very sure, but when you run a thread it runs independent of main thread, having said you cannot predict that if your SECOND loop will finish first or your thread loop. Having a thread incrementing N and main loop decreasing it, will at same time mean it eventually end up something between -1000000 to 1000000 excluding upper limits :). So your output is quite obvious to me. –  Sumit Gupta Aug 9 '13 at 5:13

4 Answers 4

up vote 7 down vote accepted

The n++ and n-- operations are not guaranteed to be atomic. Each operation has three phases:

  1. Read current value from memory
  2. Modify value (increment/decrement)
  3. Write value to memory

Since both of your threads are doing this repeatedly, and you have no control over the scheduling of the threads, you will have situations like this:

  • Thread1: Get n (value = 0)
  • Thread1: Increment (value = 1)
  • Thread2: Get n (value = 0)
  • Thread1: Write n (n == 1)
  • Thread2: Decrement (value = -1)
  • Thread1: Get n (value = 1)
  • Thread2: Write n (n == -1)

And so on.

This is why it is always important to lock access to shared data.

-- Code:

static void Main(string[] args)
{

    int n = 0;
    object lck = new object();

    var up = new Thread(() => 
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
            {
                lock (lck)
                    n++;
            }
        });

    up.Start();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
    {
        lock (lck)
            n--;
    }

    up.Join();

    Console.WriteLine(n);

    Console.ReadLine();
}

-- Edit: more on how lock works...

When you use the lock statement it attempts to acquire a lock on the object you supply it - the lck object in my code above. If that object is already locked, the lock statement will cause your code to wait for the lock to be released before continuing.

The C# lock statement is effectively the same as a Critical Section. Effectively it is similar to the following C++ code:

// declare and initialize the critical section (analog to 'object lck' in code above)
CRITICAL_SECTION lck;
InitializeCriticalSection(&lck);

// Lock critical section (same as 'lock (lck) { ...code... }')
EnterCriticalSection(&lck);
__try
{
    // '...code...' goes here
    n++;
}
__finally
{
    LeaveCriticalSection(&lck);
}

The C# lock statement abstracts most of that away, meaning that it's much harder for us to enter a critical section (acquire a lock) and forget to leave it.

The important thing though is that only your locking object is affected, and only with regard to other threads trying to acquire a lock on the same object. Nothing stops you from writing code to modify the locking object itself, or from accessing any other object. YOU are responsible for making your sure your code respect the locks, and always acquires a lock when writing to a shared object.

Otherwise you're going to have a non-deterministic outcome like you've seen with this code, or what the spec-writers like to call 'undefined behavior'. Here Be Dragons (in the form of bugs you'll have endless trouble with).

share|improve this answer
    
why is it when you remove the lock from the n--; for loop, n ends up being a large negative number? I would have thought it would be a large positive number because while n is locked in the n++; for loop, the n-- for loop can't access it, meaning n will increment, however since there is no lock on the n--; for loop, the n++; for loop can increment it even while the n--; is decrementing it. –  Backwards_Dave Aug 9 '13 at 5:26
    
If the lock is only being asserted on one of the threads then it is not protecting the data. The lock operates on the lck object with no concern for anything else, so it doesn't stop another thread from modifying n, leaving you in the same position. All you are doing is adding processing overhead to the thread that is capturing and releasing the lock, which just changes the scheduling. –  Corey Aug 9 '13 at 5:30
    
I don't fully understand what you mean. the lock is definitely still doing something. If you apply the lock to only the n--; for loop, then you get a large negative number. If you apply the lock to only the n++; for loop, you get a large positive number, and I can't work out why it's producing these results, I'd assume it'd produce the opposite. –  Backwards_Dave Aug 9 '13 at 5:34
    
Your increment loop locks, manipulates the value, unlocks, processes the for loop, etc. Meanwhile the decrement loop has done a bunch of operations, slamming the value your increment loop just saved, replacing the incremented value with a much decremented value. It's a change in the scheduling caused by one loop being slower. –  Corey Aug 9 '13 at 5:45

Yes, up.Join() will ensure that both of the loops end before WriteLine is called.

However, what is happening is that the both of the loops are being executed simultaneously, each one in it's own thread.

The switching between the two threads is done all the time by the operation system, and each program run will show a different switching timing set.

You should also be aware that n-- and n++ are not atomic operations, and are actually being compiled to 3 sub-operations, e.g.:

Take value from memory
Increase it by one
Put value in memory

The last piece of the puzzle, is that the thread context switching can occur inside the n++ or n--, between any of the above 3 operations.

That is why the final value is non-deterministic.

share|improve this answer
    
Ah, you beat me to the punch :) –  Corey Aug 9 '13 at 5:15
    
So basically, if n-- and n++ WERE atomic (ie. didn't consists of 3 steps), then the result would be 0 each time? btw I can see that adding a "lock" line in each for loop forces the result to be 0 each time. –  Backwards_Dave Aug 9 '13 at 5:20
    
Yes, you should see @Corey's answer for the lock mechanism example... :) –  Liel Aug 9 '13 at 5:21
    
@user2063755 Yes, atomic operations (like the various Interlocked* Win32 API functions) would give the answer you're expecting, but getting them to work with managed code is a royal pain in the rear. –  Corey Aug 9 '13 at 5:22
    
@Corey There are built in Interlocked wrappers in the framework. All he needs to do is replace n++ with Interlocked.Increment(ref n) and n-- with Interlocked.Deccrement(ref n) –  Scott Chamberlain Aug 9 '13 at 6:56

If you don't want to use locks there are atomic versions of the increment and decrement opperators in the Interlocked class.

Change your code to the following and you will always get 0 for an answer.

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    int n = 0;

    var up = new Thread(() =>
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
            {
                Interlocked.Increment(ref n);
            }
        });

    up.Start();

    for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
    {
        Interlocked.Decrement(ref n);
    }

    up.Join();

    Console.WriteLine(n);

    Console.ReadLine();
}
share|improve this answer

You need to join the threads earlier:

static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int n = 0;

        var up = new Thread(() =>
        {
            for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
            {
                n++;
            }
        });

        up.Start();
        up.Join();

        for (int i = 0; i < 1000000; i++)
        {
            n--;
        }


        Console.WriteLine(n);

        Console.ReadLine();
    }
share|improve this answer
1  
Wrong answer. He wants both loops to run concurrently, not sequentially as your code does. The correct answer is to use locking to access the shared data. –  Corey Aug 9 '13 at 5:17
1  
Ah, guess I've read the question wrong... –  Luc Bos Aug 9 '13 at 5:18

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.