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This is the standard text when Visual Studio generates the try catch syntax. I find I always have to go through and add the "ex" variable to "catch (Exception ex)".

Why didn't Microsoft include "e" or "ex", and why would anyone want to catch an exception and not want it's details??

try
{

}
catch (Exception)
{

throw;
}
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It's worth pointing out that in python you can just catch the exception without specifying a variable name for it. I don't know the reason behind this though. –  test Aug 9 '13 at 5:16

4 Answers 4

up vote 2 down vote accepted

Also if you just want to rethrow the Exception to be handled at another point in the program, by specifying an Exception variable by name in your throw you will lose the Stack Trace and the useful information contained within. Read this for more information.

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Because,

There are many types of Exceptions can occur. And, You may want to Handle those Exceptions at your own. Thats, why we have an Execption inside Catch Statement.

Don't forget : You can have try Catch Statement like this :

Try{

}
Catch(ExceptionType1 ex)
{
   --Handle that Type of Exception accordingly
}
Catch(ExceptionTypeAnother ex)
{
    -- Handle that Type of Exception Accordingly
}
Catch(Exception ex)    --If another problems happens but not above then
{
     -- Error that might happen if the above fails 
 }

Hope you understand what im trying to make you understand.

The, thing you are pointing out is an Excellent Feature provided by Microsoft i think.

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Many developers, as a matter of course, turn on "Treat Warnings as Errors" in their projects. This code

try
{

}
catch (Exception ex)
{
    throw;
}

Will generate at least a warning (or an error, if, as above, the developers have TWAE turned on). It's generally a bad idea to automatically add code that raises new warnings or will cause the code to fail to compile. So that's why it doesn't add the ex.

There may also be circumstances where an exception from a particular block of code may have one, and only one, cause. In such a case, you don't need to inspect the exception object in any way - you already know how you're going to recover from the situation. In such a case, you might, legitimately, not inspect the exception object - and would again get a warning or an error if the Exception was given a name.

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I rarely need the instance of the exception. That's why they call them "exceptions"; if everything was an exception, we might as well throw out the term "error". By specifying the subclassed exceptions that you expect to catch, you can handle specific cases and rethrow when you actually have a bug.

Ex. If you're trying to parse an int, you'll expect to catch a FormatException. You don't need to know anything else about the exception type, just the possibility that the argument may be invalid.

In this case, this is uesless:

try{
    int a = int.parse(someString);
} catch(FormatException ex)
{
    Console.WriteLine("someString cannot be parsed to an int!");
    //Do we really need the exception instance e?
}
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