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I have the name of a stored procedure stored in a database (and a couple of views). At run time I query the database and then run the needed query. Since I don't know the field names of the query nor do I have a known object to store the results to I use a dynamic variable

dynamic results = Respository.GetTableContents(); 
// not exactly the code but it conveys the point

The table would have an unknown number of fields, but for this example the field names are

Id, FirstName, Lastname  //(this is what the table would be returning) 

// Normally stored to a list of the model type
List<Users> resultsFromTable = ...

The resulting dynamic data can be accessed by

foreach(var r in result)
{
    string name = r.FirstName + " " + r.LastName;
    //.... Do something with the code, etc.
}

That is great if you know the property names. I don't know the property names.

How do I access the data of the dynamic variable without knowing the property name?

My main goal would be to use this in the view (razor).

Maybe I have approached the problem wrong and there is a better way. Any thoughts?

share|improve this question
2  
I am not sure what your Respository.GetTableContents() returns, but I would use a simple System.Data.DataTable Then I would just use foreach(DataColumn column in table.Columns). In this case you'd get DataColumn type which can be used to get ColumnName property of the column, including its DataType, length, and of course its value –  cha Aug 9 '13 at 5:46
    
If your Respository.GetTableContents() returns some class based on ExpandoObject you could cast it to IDictionary<string, Object> –  pwas Aug 9 '13 at 7:43
    
@cha This is what I thought would work, but we just implemented this fancy database repository. Hopefully the answer below will work out. If not then I might have to persuade them for this solution. –  Ekaterina Aug 10 '13 at 1:08

1 Answer 1

up vote 2 down vote accepted

An alternative would be to use System.Reflection. Try this:

foreach (var r in results)
{
    string name, trimmedName = "";
    if (r.GetType() == typeof(ExpandoObject))
    { 
        name = ((IDictionary<string,object>)r).ToList()
            .Aggregate<KeyValuePair<string,object>, string>("", (s, p) =>
        {
            return s + " " + p.Value;
        });
        trimmedName = name.Trim();
    }
    else
    {
        PropertyInfo[] ps = r.GetType().GetProperties();
        name = ps.Aggregate<PropertyInfo, string>("", (s, p) =>
        {
            return s + " " + p.GetValue(r);
        });
        trimmedName = name.Trim();
    }
    // use the trimmedName 
    Console.WriteLine(trimmedName);
}

[EDIT] Based on @pwas' suggestio, here's an version of he code with an improved Cyclomatic Complexity:

foreach (var r in results)
{
    ProcessResult(r);
}

Where ProcessResult has 2 overloads:

static void ProcessResult(ExpandoObject r)
{
    string name, trimmedName = "";
    name = ((IDictionary<string, object>)r).ToList()
        .Aggregate<KeyValuePair<string, object>, string>("", (s, p) =>
        {
            return s + " " + p.Value;
        });
    trimmedName = name.Trim();
    FurtherProcess(trimmedName);
}

static void ProcessResult(object r)
{
    string name, trimmedName = "";
    PropertyInfo[] ps = r.GetType().GetProperties();
    name = ps.Aggregate<PropertyInfo, string>("", (s, p) =>
    {
        return s + " " + p.GetValue(r);
    });
    FurtherProcess(trimmedName);
}

private static void FurtherProcess(string trimmedName)
{
    Console.WriteLine(trimmedName);
}

Here is the improvement:

Type        Maintainability     Cyclomatic
            Index               Complexity
Program     54                  24
// After code optimization
Program     69                  16
share|improve this answer
    
Not sure if this is going to work for Expando based objects.... –  zespri Aug 9 '13 at 7:33
    
Now it will work :) –  Alex Filipovici Aug 9 '13 at 7:43
1  
Nice, but I'd split processing r to separate methods in order to avoid if statement. For example: prepare method public void ProcessResult(ExpandoObject eo) { \\ your code } and public void ProcessResult(object o) { \\ your code } and then call it foreach (var r in result) ProcessResult(r). In this case, r is dynamic, so its type will be resolved at the runtime and proper overloaded method will be used. Then you could easily add method for processing specific type. My little digression :) –  pwas Aug 9 '13 at 7:53
    
@pwas, very nice suggestion, I'll update my answer based on it. –  Alex Filipovici Aug 9 '13 at 8:28
    
@pwas In this case, r is dynamic, so its type will be resolved at the runtime and proper overloaded method will be used. I had no idea dynamic works like this. Nice! –  zespri Aug 9 '13 at 8:37

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