Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.
public static void main(String args[]) {
    myMethod(); // i am calling static method from main()
 }

.

public static ? myMethod(){ // ? = what should be the return type
    return value;// is String
    return index;// is int
}

myMethod() will return String and int value. So take these returning values from main() i came up with following solution.

create a class call ReturningValues

public class ReturningValues {
private String value;
private int index;

// getters and setters here
}

and change myMethod() as follows.

 public static ReturningValues myMethod() {
    ReturningValues rv = new ReturningValues();
    rv.setValue("value");
    rv.setIndex(12);
    return rv;
}

Now my question,is there any easier way to achieve this??

share|improve this question
1  
You could use Properties or HashMap or even List, but I thing your ReturnValues is more appropriate as it's unambiguous as to what the method will return –  MadProgrammer Aug 9 '13 at 6:12
    
How are index and value related? –  Rohit Jain Aug 9 '13 at 6:13

6 Answers 6

No. Java methods can only return one result (void, a primitive, or an object), and creating a struct-type class like this is exactly how you do it.

As a note, it is frequently possible to make classes like your ReturningValues immutable like this:

public class ReturningValues {
    public final String value;
    public final int index;

    public ReturningValues(String value, int index) {
        this.value = value;
        this.index = index;
    }
}

This has the advantage that a ReturningValues can be passed around, such as between threads, with no concerns about accidentally getting things out of sync.

share|improve this answer

This can be one of the solution. But your present solution is good enough. You can also add new variables and still keep it clean, which cannot be done with present code.

private static final int INDEX_OF_STRING_PARAM = 0;
private static final int INDEX_OF_INT_PARAM = 1;

public static Object[] myMethod() {
    Object[] values = new Object[2];
    values[INDEX_OF_STRING_PARAM] = "value";
    values[INDEX_OF_INT_PARAM] = 12;
    return values;
}
share|improve this answer
    
This will work, but it's much less type-safe and more difficult to read. –  chrylis Aug 9 '13 at 6:15
    
@chrylis Yes I agree totally. I have mentioned that only limited to two or three return values the present code will be manageable. But the better one is the one by OP as it is type safe and more understandable. –  Narendra Pathai Aug 9 '13 at 6:17

Generally if you are not sure of what value you will end up returning, you should consider using return-type as super-class of all the return values. In this case, where you need to return String or int, consider returning Object class(which is the base class of all the classes defined in java).

But be careful to have instanceof checks where you are calling this method. Or else you may end up getting ClassCastException.

public static void main(String args[]) {
        Object obj = myMethod(); // i am calling static method from main() which return Object
    if(obj instanceof String){
    // Do something
    }else(obj instance of Integer) {
    //do something else
     }
share|improve this answer

the approach you took is good. Just Implementation may need to be better. For instance ReturningValues should be well defined and Its better if you can make ReturningValues as immutable.

// this approach is better
public static ReturningValues myMethod() {
    ReturningValues rv = new ReturningValues("value", 12);
    return rv;
}


public final class ReturningValues {
    private final String value;
    private final int index;


    public ReturningValues(String value, int index) {
      this.value = value;
      this.index = index;
     }

} 

Or if you have lots of key value pairs you can use HashMap then

public static Map<String,Object> myMethod() {
  Map<String,Object> map = new HashMap<String,Object>();
  map.put(VALUE, "value");
  map.put(INDEX, 12);
  return Collections.unmodifiableMap(map); // try to use this 
}
share|improve this answer

@ruchira ur solution it self is best.But i think if it is only about integer and a string we can do it in much easy and simple way..

class B {


public String myfun() {

    int a=2;           //Integer .. you could use scanner or pass parameters ..i have simply assigned

    String b="hi";      //String

    return Integer.toString(a)+","+b; //returnig string and int with "," in middle

}   

}

class A {

public static void main(String args[]){

    B obj=new B();  // obj of class B with myfun() method

    String returned[]=obj.myfun().split(",");
         //splitting integer and string values with "," and storing them in array

    int b1=Integer.parseInt(returned[0]); //converting first value in array to integer.

    System.out.println(returned[0]); //printing integer

    System.out.println(returned[1]); //printing String
}

}

i hope it was useful.. :)

share|improve this answer
up vote 0 down vote accepted

Finally i thought my way is better since when number of return types go higher this kind of a implementation do that in best way.

public static ReturningValues myMethod() {
ReturningValues rv = new ReturningValues();
rv.setValue("value");
rv.setIndex(12);
return rv;
}
share|improve this answer

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.