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I've been recently experimenting with prototyping in javascript and I can't figure out why the following code doesn't work. What I would like to do is create a new instance of cheese with parameter n.

function food(n) {
    this.n=n;
}
function cheese(n) {
    alert(this.n);
}
cheese.prototype=new food;
new cheese('paramesian');
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3 Answers

up vote 5 down vote accepted

You are creating a new Cheese instance, and the argument n is never used or assigned to the Cheese instance variable this.n, because that logic is only used on the Food constructor.

You can do a couple of things:

1 . Apply the Food constructor inside the Cheese function, using the arguments object and the newly created context (this).

function Food(n) {
    this.n=n;
}

function Cheese(n) {
    Food.apply (this, arguments);
    alert(this.n);
}

new Cheese('paramesian');

2 . Repeat the Food constructor logic (this.n = n) on the Cheese constructor function:

function Food(n) {
    this.n=n;
}

function Cheese(n) {
    this.n = n;
    alert(this.n);
}

Cheese.prototype = new Food();
new Cheese('paramesian');

3 . Use another technique, like power constructors:

function food (n) {
  var instance = {};
  instance.n = n;

  return instance;
}


function cheese (n) {
  var instance = food(n);
  alert(instance.n);

  return instance;
}

cheese('parmesian');
cheese('gouda');

4 . Yet another option, prototypal inheritance:

// helper function
if (typeof Object.create !== 'function') {
  Object.create = function (o) {
    function F () {}
    F.prototype = o;
    return new F();
  };
}

var food = {
  n: "base food",
  showName : function () { alert(this.n); }
};

var cheese1 = Object.create(food);
cheese1.n = 'parmesian';
cheese1.showName(); // method exists only in 'food'
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I like #3, but you have to remove the 'new' in front of 'food(n)'. –  Magnar Nov 29 '09 at 0:51
    
@Magnar, yes was a typo, fixed, no this or new used... –  CMS Nov 29 '09 at 1:06
    
Thanks for the informative answer. Option number 1 seems to be the best choice for now, at least until fully understand #3. –  Kenneth Nov 29 '09 at 1:13
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Seems like you just want to understand how prototype chaining works in JavaScript. The following is an excellent, simple and well explained tutorial http://www.herongyang.com/JavaScript/Inheritance-from-Constructor-Prototype-Object.html

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Edit, This is apparently not prototypical inheritance (see comments), but it does seem to work for this particular purpose.

function food(n) {
    this.n=n;
}
function cheese(n) {
    this.prototype = food;
    this.prototype(n);

    alert(this.n);
}

new cheese('paramesian');
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Why the down vote? This is a perfectly valid method... –  Atli Nov 29 '09 at 1:14
    
You got the downvote from me because that's not how prototypical inheritance works in JavaScriupt. You could have just as well said this.anything = food; this.anything(n) and you would have still got the correct alert. But cheese by no means entered the prototype chain with that code. –  Crescent Fresh Nov 29 '09 at 1:44
    
I didn't downvoted you, but the prototype object meant to be used on constructor functions not on object instances (like this is), your example works because when you call this.prototype(n);, you are executing food in the context of the new "cheese" object (this) just like the first example I posted, try to change the prototype keyword on your example for foobar and you'll see that it works also, it has nothing to do with the prototype chain... –  CMS Nov 29 '09 at 1:47
    
Ahh ok, I see. Thanks, that's helpful. Seems I misunderstood the basic concept there. Still kind of fuzzy on this prototype stuff, to be hones. Haven't really needed it so far. –  Atli Nov 29 '09 at 2:46
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