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I have a HTML table correctly formatted the way I want it using the colspan element. What I also want however is for the elements that occupy multiple columns to have some kind of border or division at the column boundaries (within the spanned element). The purpose for this is to make it easy for the user to see how many columns a spanned element occupies.

For example if an element in a table occupies one row and 4 columns there could be three divisions within the element. Thanks.

<div id="debug_con">
    <h2>Debug Modes</h2>
    <table class="debug">
      <tr>
        <th>Group Name</th>
        <th>Width</th>
        <th>Type</th>
        <th>Group Address (dec)</th>
        <th>Group Address (in HEX)</th>
        <th>GPIO7</th>
        <th>GPIO6</th>
        <th>GPIO5</th>
        <th>GPIO4</th>
        <th>GPIO3</th>
        <th>GPIO2</th>
        <th>GPIO1</th>
        <th>GPIO0</th>
      </tr>
      <tr class="W">
        <td>debug_1</td>
        <td>8</td>
        <td>output</td>
        <td>0</td>
        <td>0x0</td>
        <td class="col1" colspan="8">demod_out</td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="W">
        <td>debug_2</td>
        <td>8</td>
        <td>output</td>
        <td>1</td>
        <td>0x1</td>
        <td class="col1" colspan="8">afc_out</td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="R">
        <td>debug_combo</td>
        <td>8</td>
        <td>input</td>
        <td>2</td>
        <td>0x2</td>
        <td class="col1" colspan="4">this_upper</td>
        <td class="col2" colspan="4">this_lower</td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="R">
        <td>n_word</td>
        <td>8</td>
        <td>input</td>
        <td>3</td>
        <td>0x3</td>
        <td class="col1" colspan="8">n_word</td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="W">
        <td>write_combo</td>
        <td>8</td>
        <td>output</td>
        <td>5</td>
        <td>0x5</td>
        <td class="unallocated" colspan="5">unallocated</td>
        <td class="col1" colspan="1">Bit_2</td>
        <td class="col2" colspan="1">Bit_1</td>
        <td class="col1" colspan="1">Bit_0</td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="W">
        <td>spi_debug</td>
        <td>8</td>
        <td>output</td>
        <td>6</td>
        <td>0x6</td>
        <td class="unallocated" colspan="6">unallocated</td>
        <td class="col1" colspan="1">spi_error</td>
        <td class="col2" colspan="1">spi_flag</td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="W">
        <td>OCL_GRP1</td>
        <td>8</td>
        <td>output</td>
        <td>8</td>
        <td>0x8</td>
        <td class="unallocated" colspan="6">unallocated</td>
        <td class="col1" colspan="1">ocl_dig_static_cal_meas_output_q</td>
        <td class="col2" colspan="1">ocl_dig_static_cal_meas_output_i</td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="W">
        <td>OCL_GRP2</td>
        <td>8</td>
        <td>output</td>
        <td>9</td>
        <td>0x9</td>
        <td class="unallocated" colspan="1">unallocated</td>
        <td class="col1" colspan="6">dig_ocl_controller_output_mag_i</td>
        <td class="col2" colspan="1">dig_ocl_controller_output_sign_i</td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="W">
        <td>OCL_GRP3</td>
        <td>8</td>
        <td>output</td>
        <td>10</td>
        <td>0xa</td>
        <td class="unallocated" colspan="1">unallocated</td>
        <td class="col1" colspan="6">dig_ocl_controller_output_mag_q</td>
        <td class="col2" colspan="1">dig_ocl_controller_output_sign_q</td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="W">
        <td>OCL_GRP4</td>
        <td>8</td>
        <td>output</td>
        <td>11</td>
        <td>0xb</td>
        <td class="col1" colspan="3">oscl_sar_core_state_q</td>
        <td class="col2" colspan="3">oscl_sar_core_state_i</td>
        <td class="col1" colspan="1">ocl_static_cal_pga_calibration_ready_q</td>
        <td class="col2" colspan="1">ocl_static_cal_pga_calibration_ready_i</td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="W">
        <td>OCL_GRP5</td>
        <td>8</td>
        <td>output</td>
        <td>12</td>
        <td>0xc</td>
        <td class="unallocated" colspan="2">unallocated</td>
        <td class="col1" colspan="6">fsm_idac_input_code_i</td>
      </tr>
      <tr class="W">
        <td>OCL_GRP6</td>
        <td>8</td>
        <td>output</td>
        <td>13</td>
        <td>0xd</td>
        <td class="unallocated" colspan="2">unallocated</td>
        <td class="col1" colspan="6">fsm_idac_input_code_q</td>
      </tr>
      .....etc.....

I am learning alot today jsfiddle is great! Ok I have a jsfiddle (thanks for the suggestion Alex) which shows how the table is currently being rendered. If you can see fsm_idac_input_code_i within the table for example, it is not obvious how many columns (GPIOs) the element occupies. If there were still some column borders within the element then the user could clearly see this without having to look at the color changes of adjacent cells or having to refer to the table header.

share|improve this question
    
can you use divs inside the colspan td to separate the elements? or you need to use just tables? –  AlexG_1010100101 Aug 9 '13 at 8:20
    
please put the code you have tried up so we can see your structure –  Pete Aug 9 '13 at 8:37
    
Hi Alex, thanks for the suggestion, could you please elaborate a bit on what you mean. Perhaps one liner example. –  Gregory Kuhn Aug 9 '13 at 9:51

2 Answers 2

up vote 0 down vote accepted

Very quick example - just to give an idea of what I meant.

Something like this, then you can style your divs as you wish - not sure is that what you need tho

    <td class="col1" colspan="1">
           <div>
               spi_error
            </div>
           <div>
               spi_error2
            </div>
    </td>
share|improve this answer
    
Well the biggest motivation for this is some table elements could be like 6 columns wide for example. When the user views the table in a browser, he/she would have no way of knowing how many columns are actually being occupied without looking at adjacent rows. I am going to edit my question with a snippet showing how my table is currently rendered which will I hope help me better explain what I mean. –  Gregory Kuhn Aug 9 '13 at 10:13
    
if u can made a jsfiddle even better –  AlexG_1010100101 Aug 9 '13 at 10:16
    
I just thought this though if you want to separate them why you don't keep the td without colspan and put a different bg color or border.? –  AlexG_1010100101 Aug 9 '13 at 13:25
    
this is the idea with divs but it s stupid - you d keep your td without colspan if u want to separate them jsfiddle.net/G8vH9/1 –  AlexG_1010100101 Aug 9 '13 at 13:26
1  
Hi again, well I decided to take the lazy approach and include the width in the table data itself, i.e. don't use CSS to denote width, merely indicate the width in text. I don't think I can obtain the result i am looking for using CSS at the moment. –  Gregory Kuhn Aug 13 '13 at 15:13

You can accomplish this without changing your existing layout.

This gives a red border to all cells that have a colspan greater than 1:

td[colspan] {
  border: 2px solid red;
}

td, td[colspan="1"] {
  border: 1px solid gray;
}

Fiddle 1


You could even show the colspan value when hovering over a cell:

td::before {
  content: "1:";
  position: absolute;
  display: none;
  left: 0;
  top: 0em;
  padding: 0.2em;
  color: red;
}

td[colspan="2"]::before {content: "2:";}
td[colspan="3"]::before {content: "3:";}
td[colspan="4"]::before {content: "4:";}
td[colspan="5"]::before {content: "5:";}
td[colspan="6"]::before {content: "6:";}
td[colspan="7"]::before {content: "7:";}
td[colspan="8"]::before {content: "8:";}

td:hover {
  padding-left: 1.5em;
}

td:hover::before {
  display: block;
}

Fiddle 2

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