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Is there a GUI application that can open serialized Java object files (both binary and XML format) and display them in browsable fashion (maybe like the Eclipse debugger displays the state of variables)?

It needs to work at least partially when not all classes can be resolved (an option to attach extra jars would be nice) or when there are serial version UID mismatches.

Extra points for the ability to make changes.

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10 Answers

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If you're using a database, the commercial DbVisualizer can display a tree view of serialized Java objects in BLOB columns. Access to class files is not required. Changes do not seem to be possible, through.

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Neat. Are you sure they do not need the class files? I wonder how that works. Still, even if they do, neat. –  Thilo Feb 23 '09 at 6:13
    
The objects I'm storing are custom classes, but use the default serializer implementation. I haven't tried to use a custom serializer implementation, but you're right, I couldn't imagine how that should work without access to the class files. –  Henning Feb 23 '09 at 9:09
    
Even using the default serializer, displaying the contents of a custom class without the class definition is great. Seems there is enough information in the stream to find out what is an int, a long, an Object and so on. –  Thilo Feb 25 '09 at 3:52
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If you use NetBeans, install http://deadlock.netbeans.org/hudson/job/nbms-and-javadoc/lastSuccessfulBuild/artifact/nbbuild/nbms/extra/org-netbeans-modules-apisupport-beanbrowser.nbm (available as "NetBeans Runtime Inspector" from Plugin Manager in development builds, otherwise download directly). In the Services tab, right-click on the Serialized Beans node to get started. If there is interest it would not be hard to extract this tool to its own module (with a more discoverable UI) and post on the Plugin Portal.

This tool parses the serialized file format directly, so there is no need to have access to the serialized classes. Modifying the ser file is not supported; this would be rather more work and is probably rarely needed.

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Just as a quick and dirty solution:

You could create a simple class in eclipse which loads/deserialises the object.

Put in a breakpoint, and use the eclipse debugging view.

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this is the one i like best: just use eclipse to browse it in the debugger. You can then customize that by creating custom detail formatters –  John Gardner Feb 22 '09 at 4:57
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Ok so I know you want a gui, but heres some code that might set you in the right direction of how this might be implemented.

First deserialization:

	File file = new File(filename);
	ObjectInputStream in = new ObjectInputStream(new FileInputStream(file));

	Object obj = in.readObject();
	in.close();

	return obj;

Once you have the object deserialized, you can use reflection to get the internals (notice how you have to check if it is accessible and if not make it accessible so you can get the actual value:

Class clazz = obj.getClass();
	Field[] fs = clazz.getDeclaredFields();
	for (Field f : fs)
	{
		boolean acc = f.isAccessible();
		if(!acc)
		{
			f.setAccessible(true);
		}

		Object fieldObj = f.get(obj);
		String fieldName = f.getName();
		f.setAccessible(acc);
    }

With that as a basis, you could probably build a tree of the internals of the object and display it to gui similar to what shows up in the eclipse debugger.

I know this isn't what you've asked for, but it might point you in the right direction to an implementation that will handle most of what you want and need.

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I am also kind of interested in the many cases where readObject() will fail because not all classes are found, or the serializedVersionId differs. –  Thilo Feb 20 '09 at 3:52
    
readObject() will throw a ClassDefNotFound, you could just catch that exception, which takes care of the first case by catching that exception. SerialId being different iI'm not sure about. –  shsteimer Feb 20 '09 at 14:14
    
Yeah, well, but catching the exception does not solve the problem of the readObject() not having worked... –  Thilo Feb 23 '09 at 6:15
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Just googling around comes up with a few suggestions to start with. Here's a promising one: Java Object Serialization in parsable ASCII format. This is a straight dump and not an Eclipse plugin however (I agree, that would be nice :)). The code is available.

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The second link gives a 404. metva.com.au/enno/papers/java_ser.html I guess is the new location. –  Jesse Glick Jun 8 '11 at 17:19
    
I have updated the second URL. Now it works again. –  Robert Nov 10 '11 at 12:25
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It's not a GUI, but jdeserialize is intended to look through serialized streams and report on what's there.

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That looks interesting: "It does not instantiate any classes described in the stream; instead, it builds up an intermediate representation of the types, instances, and values. Because of this, it can analyze streams without access to the class code that generated them" –  Thilo Jan 5 '12 at 23:56
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If you are familar with XSL/T, you can serialize the object and output the XML with the XSL stylesheet, you can view the XML from any internet browser.

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The simple tool you are looking for was developed some years ago by a systems research group at St. Andrews University. It is a pity the program is no longer available, but by following the advice given by shsteimer and the guidelines the paper offers, it shouldn't be that hard to develop a home-made one.

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I love the screenshots in that PDF. Flash from the widget past... –  Thilo Feb 25 '09 at 3:50
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There is also a Python utility for deserializing, printing, editing and reserializing Java serializations. You can find it under

http://code.google.com/p/python-javaobj/

Note that not everything is implemented, yet.

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The best tool I found to the job was: http://www.programmers-friend.org/JOI/ Very simple to integrate on your code, just adding:

org.pf.joi.Inspector.inspect( objectToInspect ); 
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