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Let's say I have two files, dir/a.js and lib/b.js

a.js:

b = require('../lib/b');
b.someFn();

b.js:

var fallback = "./config.json";
module.exports = {
  someFn = function(jsonFile) {
    console.log(require(jsonFile || fallback);
  }
}

The entire purpose of b.js in this example is to read a json file, so I might call it as b.someFn("path/to/file.json").

But I want there to be a default, like a config file. But the default should be relative to a.js and not b.js. In other words, I should be able to call b.someFn() from a.js, and it should say, "since you didn't pass me the path, I will assume a default path of config.json." But the default should be relative to a.js, i.e. should be dir/config.json and not lib/config.json, which I would get if I did require(jsonFile).

I could get the cwd, but that will only work if I launch the script from within dir/.

Is there any way for b.js to say, inside someFn(), "give me the __dirname of the function that called me?"

share|improve this question
    
Can you modify the b module? –  Gabriel Llamas Aug 9 '13 at 11:07
    
Yes, I own b, no problem. Actually, b is turning into a module, I just want it to be able to have a default file relative to the caller. –  deitch Aug 9 '13 at 12:19
    
Then simply set use the directory where a.js is located. See the answer. –  Gabriel Llamas Aug 9 '13 at 12:53

2 Answers 2

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Use callsite, then:

b.js:

var path = require('path'),
    callsite = require('callsite');

module.exports = {
  someFn: function () {
    var stack = callsite(),
        requester = stack[1].getFileName();

    console.log(path.dirname(requester));
  }
};
share|improve this answer
1  
Nice! I like it! –  deitch Aug 9 '13 at 12:20
    
It definitely worked! –  Marcello de Sales Aug 19 '14 at 1:04

If you want to get the directory of the script of the caller function, then use the stacktrace as the above answer shows, otherwise, what's the problem of hardcoding the directory of a.js?

var fallback = "dir_a/config.json";
module.exports = {
  someFn = function(jsonFile) {
    console.log(require(jsonFile || fallback);
  }
}
share|improve this answer
    
Because b.js doesn't know about the directory of a.js. In my example, I simplified it so that we know both, but really b.js is inside an npm module. –  deitch Aug 10 '13 at 17:49

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