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This is a C program that i am trying to make print a list of ASCII characters. I could make the program print a range of numbers, bit i cannot get it to print the ASCII value of each number in the list.

#include <stdio.h>
#define N 127

int main(void) 
{   
    int n;  
    int c;

    for (n=32; n<=N; n++) {
        char c = atoi( n); 
        printf("%d", c);
    }
    return 0;
}
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printf("%c", c); –  fvu Aug 9 '13 at 11:11

7 Answers 7

up vote 4 down vote accepted

atoi converts ASCII to int. You are passing it n. n is not ASCII; it is int. Therefore, atoi(n) does not work.

After deleting that, what you want to do is print the ASCII character that n represents. You do this with:

printf("%c", n);

You might want to label each character with its number, like this:

for (n=32; n<=N; n++) {
    printf("%d: %c\n", n, n);
}

Incidentally. this requires that your C implementation use ASCII for its execution character set (and for its “C locale”). Many do. However, this program will not be portable to an implementation that uses a different character set.

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Use %c for the ASCII value, like so: printf("%d, %c\n", n, n); Then remove the atoi() line.

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Have a look at printf formats.

Indeed, %d is used to print signed decimal integers. You want to print the corresponding character, so the format you are looking for is %c.

So it gives :

printf("%d", c);
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for (n=32; n<=N; n++) {
    printf("%c", n);
}

You can print n to characters directly using %c

Note that you defined two variable c, the inner one (char c)will shadow the outer one(int c), that's valid C, but usually bad practice.

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Atoi convert ascii entry in int representation. The program is :

#include <stdio.h>
#define N 127

int main()
{
  int n;

  for (n=32; n<=N; n++) 
    printf("%c",n) ;

  return 0;
}
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Replace

printf("%d", c) 

with

printf("%c", c)

Also, you don't need atoi.

Just the following is enough:

int main(void) 
{   
    int n;  

    for (n=32; n<=N; n++) {
        printf("%c", n);
    }
    return 0;
}
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You should be using %c as format specifier instead of %d.

#include <stdio.h>
#include <conio.h>
#define N 127
int main(void) 
{   
    int n;  
    for (n=32; n<=N; n++)
        printf("%c", n);
    getch();
    return 0;
}
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