Take the 2-minute tour ×
Stack Overflow is a question and answer site for professional and enthusiast programmers. It's 100% free, no registration required.

I am currently using column header's as links that when clicked will sort the results by the column name by adding a get variable to the url. Here is an example:

<a href="
  <?php
  // Sorts by order id. If already sorted by order id, then it will change the link to sort descending
  if(!isset($_GET['sortby']) || $_GET['sortby'] != 'order_id'){
    echo $_SERVER['SCRIPT_NAME'] . '?sortby=order_id';  //example: tracker.php?sortby=order_id
  } elseif(isset($_GET['sortby']) || $_GET['sortby'] == 'order_id'){
    echo $_SERVER['SCRIPT_NAME'] . '?sortby=order_id_desc'; //example: tracker.php?sortby=order_id_desc
  }?>
">Order ID</a>

I also have a form where users can enter pick a category from a selectbox and then enter a searchterm. I am using if statements and switch statements to check if the $_GET['sortby'] variable and the $_POST['search_submit'] variable is set and if so, to run a certain sql statement based on the value of the GET variable.

There are 4 different scenarios.

1. Default: If neither sort nor search is set. This one works fine:

if(!isset($_GET['sortby']) && !isset($_POST['search_submit'])){ //Default, If no sort or search is set
  $sql = 'SELECT * 
          FROM orders 
          ORDER BY order_id DESC'; 
}

2. If the search is set but the sort is not. This one works fine:

if(isset($_POST['search_submit'])) {
  $search_string = ' WHERE ' . $_POST['searchby'] . '= "' . $_POST['search_input'] . '" ';
}

if(!isset($_GET['sortby']) && isset($_POST['search_submit']) ){ //If the search is set but no sort
  $sql = "SELECT * 
          FROM orders"
          . $search_string . 
          "ORDER BY order_id DESC";
}

3. If the sort is set, but the search is not. This one works fine:

if(isset($_GET['sortby']) && !isset($_POST['search_submit'])) { //If the sort is set but no search
  switch ($_GET['sortby']) { 
    case "order_id":
      $sql = "SELECT * 
              FROM orders 
              ORDER BY order_id ASC";
    break;

    case "order_id_desc":
      $sql = "SELECT * 
              FROM orders  
              ORDER BY order_id DESC";
    break;
  }
}

4. If the search AND sort is set. All 3 of the above if statements work, but the last one is giving me problems.

if(isset($_GET['sortby']) && isset($_POST['search_submit'])) { //If the sort AND search is set
  switch ($_GET['sortby']) { 
    case "order_id":
      $sql = "SELECT * 
              FROM orders"
              . $search_string . 
              "ORDER BY order_id ASC";
    break;

    case "order_id_desc":
      $sql = "SELECT * 
              FROM orders"
              . $search_string . 
              "ORDER BY order_id DESC";
    break; 
  }
}

What happens is that you can search, but as soon as you click on one of the column headers and it reloads the page with the new GET variable, it will get rid of the current POST variable, thereby showing all results again. I tried to load the current POST variable into a session after the $_POST['search_submit'] isset and then make the last if statement check to see if the session variable is set, but what happens then is that the session is always set and if i try to go back to the homepage, it will keep those search results.

Perhaps I need to destroy the session somewhere? Perhaps there is an overall better approach I could be taking to combining sort and search features?

share|improve this question
1  
Chris, most of the answers including mine suggest switching to GET. Is there a specific reason you cannot? Don't want you left in the cold without relevant answers if you don't have the choice to change from a POST to a GET –  Doug Neiner Nov 29 '09 at 4:02
    
No, I can do whatever works. No problem at all changing to GET. I actually saw your answer and switched all my POST variables to GET variables. It works, but the only problem is that once the user clicks on one of the column headers in order to sort through the search results, the search GET variables disappear and it sorts through all results, instead of the search results. You know what I mean? –  zeckdude Nov 29 '09 at 4:19
    
Ah... doh! I updated my answer to show how I would handle it. You could also do it with javascript, but this way works w/o javascript as well. –  Doug Neiner Nov 29 '09 at 4:41
    
Posted code is vulnerable to SQL injection: php.net/manual/en/security.database.sql-injection.php, securiteam.com/securityreviews/5DP0N1P76E.html –  outis Nov 29 '09 at 4:59
    
@outis I agree, but he must have magic_quotes turned on because in his test link, all items are escaped and SQL injection was not possible. Already tried ;) –  Doug Neiner Nov 29 '09 at 5:20
add comment

4 Answers

up vote 3 down vote accepted

I would recommend changing the search form from a method="POST" to method="GET" and use just GET for all your requests. If you cannot change your POST requests, you are going to need to POST each request (including sorting), which will require javascript attached to your sort links.

The benefit to using GET is that your users can bookmark specific searches since all the data would be contained in the Query string.

EDIT: Retaining the search strings in subsequent requests:

I would abstract out your sorting code to something like this:

<?php
function write_sortable_header_link( $column_id, $column_name ){
   if( ( isset($_GET['sortby']) && $_GET['sortby'] != $column_id ) || !isset($_GET['sortby']) )
     $query = "?sortby=$column_id";
   else
     $query = '?sortby='.$column_id.'_desc';

   if( isset($_GET['searchsubmit']) ){
     $query .= '&amp;searchsubmit=1';
     $query .= '&amp;searchby=' . urlencode( isset($_GET['searchby']) ? $_GET['searchby'] : '' );
     $query .= '&amp;search_input=' . urlencode( isset($_GET['search_input']) ? $_GET['search_input'] : '' );
   }

   $href = $_SERVER['SCRIPT_NAME'] . $query;
   echo "<a href='$href'>$column_name</a>";
}
?>

You would then call it like this:

<?php write_sortable_header_link( 'order_id', 'Order Id' ); ?>

It would make sure your sorting URL's contain the correct query string arguments for persistence.

share|improve this answer
    
I just now tried doing this and it works to a point. As soon as I click on one of the column headers, it reloads the page with the sorting get variables but the search get variables are gone, so it reverts to sorting through all the results –  zeckdude Nov 29 '09 at 4:07
    
I personally would skip all the 'isset' tests and just turn off the error reporting for the notices about it not being valid, but I left them in since you were using them. –  Doug Neiner Nov 29 '09 at 4:42
    
WOW! Thanks so very much! I highly appreciate that you went out of your way to help me! It all seems pretty straightforward, but I'm a little unsure of the urlencode function. I looked it up on php.net, but it doesn't make sense to me. I tried looking at the link's url, but it doesnt't include some of the characters you used in the urlencode, such as the question mark and colon. –  zeckdude Nov 29 '09 at 5:19
    
Hey Chris, those are just basically inline 'if' statements: true == false ? return_this_if_true : return_this_if_false. So, if the $_GET['searchby'] item was set, return its value, if not, return an empty string. You can read more here: php.net/manual/en/… –  Doug Neiner Nov 29 '09 at 5:23
    
Thanks again for all your help! I rewrote your code to make it a bit more simple for me. I posted it on the bottom. I would be interested if you think it's still ok. It does still work. –  zeckdude Nov 29 '09 at 5:58
add comment

Try to use $_GET only, involving $_POST seems unnecessary.

share|improve this answer
add comment

Not an answer to your question, but just my 0.2

In your situation I usually do the sorting client side in the web browser using javascript. It prevents essentially the same query being run over and over again with only different ORDER BY parameters.

With jquery there are even some very nice plugins that make it pretty easy.

example: http://tablesorter.com/docs/

share|improve this answer
1  
DataTables (datatables.net) with jQuery is pretty nice too for client-side sorting. And it's true it is useful in some situations to do the sorting without hitting back the server. It depends on the number of rows involved and the kind of browser support your targetted user group has. –  lpfavreau Nov 29 '09 at 3:57
add comment

This is the code I ended up using to make the link rewrite with the sort and search get variables as suggested by dcneiner. I took out the urlencode, the switched & to the '&' sign and made the inline if statement read as just the get variable, since the only way those get variables can be set is if the search_submit is set since they're part of the same form. I also added the '{' and '}' back into the if and else statements. I'm guessing you're using a slightly different way of doing PHP? Do you see anything wrong or unsecure about the changes I made? I wasn't too sure why you did it your way. But thanks again.

function write_sortable_header_link( $column_id, $column_name ){ //Function that creates a link with the search query if needed
  if( ($_GET['sortby'] != $column_id) || !isset($_GET['sortby']) ) { //If the GET variable is not the column id of this button or if the GET sortby variable has not been set
    $query = "?sortby=$column_id"; //then add this to the end of the url
  } else {
      $query = '?sortby='.$column_id.'_desc'; //otherwise if the GET variable is the column id of this button, then add the descending code to the end of the variable
  }

  if(isset($_GET['search_submit']) ){ //If the GET variable search_submit is in the url
    $query .= '&search_submit=1'; //then add this to the end of the url string
    $query .= '&searchby=' . $_GET['searchby']; //add whatever is currently in the GET searchby to the end of the url string
    $query .= '&search_input=' . $_GET['search_input']; //add whatever is currently in the GET search_input to the end of the url string
  }

  $href = $_SERVER['SCRIPT_NAME'] . $query; //this is the href part of the link
  echo "<a href='$href'>$column_name</a>"; //this creates the actual link
}
share|improve this answer
1  
The urlencode is important for security. The user could insert crafted HTML into your page. Also older browsers will break if spaces aren't encoded, etc. Everything else is fine! –  Doug Neiner Nov 29 '09 at 6:12
    
Cool! Thanks again! +1 –  zeckdude Nov 29 '09 at 6:24
add comment

Your Answer

 
discard

By posting your answer, you agree to the privacy policy and terms of service.

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.