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I am doing the following:

#!/usr/bin/perl  
use strict;  
use warnings;  

my $proc = `ps -ef|grep -c myscriptname`;  
print $proc;  

This prints 2 when I run it inside the script.

ps -ef|grep -c myscriptname on the command line just shows: 1
Why?

same for my $proc = qx/ps -ef|grep -c myscriptname/

UPDATE
To be clear I run this snippet from somerandomscript.pl

Update 2
Following the advice of edorqui I remove -c getting:

12013 15777 15776 0 14:11 pts/6 00:00:00 sh -c ps -ef | grep myscriptname   
12013 15779 15777 0 14:11 pts/6 00:00:00 grep myscriptname Argument "12013 15777 15776 0 14:11 pts/6 00:00:00 sh -c ps..." isn't numeric in numeric gt (>) at somerandomscript.pl line 8  

from inside the script

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Did you display the hits? Would one of them be the grep itself? –  mirod Aug 9 '13 at 11:57
    
This is a rather bad way to determine that you have a process running particularly when it's possible to have more than one instance of the process (or script) running. –  devnull Aug 9 '13 at 12:15
    
@devnull:What is the best way? –  Cratylus Aug 9 '13 at 12:20
    
One way is to make the script write the PID to a file and remove it when the script ends (maybe at the end of the script itself). Now whenever you need to check whether the script is running, poll for the file instead. –  devnull Aug 9 '13 at 12:26

4 Answers 4

The ps -ef command is showing the grep itself.

To skip this behaviour, try grepping for a regex condition that does not match the grep itself:

ps -ef | grep myscript[n]ame

or whatever similar can make it:

ps -ef | grep myscriptnam[e]

Explanation

If you run a sleep command in the background:

$ sleep 100 &
[1] 9768

and then look for it with ps -ef:

$ ps -ef | grep sleep
me    9768  3673  0 14:00 pts/6    00:00:00 sleep 100
me    9771  3673  0 14:00 pts/6    00:00:00 grep --color=auto sleep

You get two lines: the process itself and the grep command looking for it. To avoid it and show just the process itselves, we can either:

$ ps -ef | grep -v grep | grep sleep

or use a regex in the code so that the grep process is not matched:

$ ps -ef | grep slee[p]
me    9768  3673  0 14:00 pts/6    00:00:00 sleep 100

because line

me    9771  3673  0 14:00 pts/6    00:00:00 grep --color=auto sleep

does not match in grep slee[p].

See explanation in a related topic.

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I am not sure what you mean by myscript[n]ame. Also I check from another script.Please see update in OP –  Cratylus Aug 9 '13 at 12:00
    
But I am running the script from another script. It is not that I get 2 because my script + grep. I test for another script name. –  Cratylus Aug 9 '13 at 12:05
    
What if you just grep myscriptname (without -c) and print the results? Which one is missing? –  fedorqui Aug 9 '13 at 12:08
    
When I run that I get from the script: 12013 15777 15776 0 14:11 pts/6 00:00:00 sh -c ps -ef | grep myscriptname 12013 15779 15777 0 14:11 pts/6 00:00:00 grep myscriptname Argument "12013 15777 15776 0 14:11 pts/6 00:00:00 sh -c ps..." isn't numeric in numeric gt (>) at somerandomscript.pl line 8. –  Cratylus Aug 9 '13 at 12:13
    
From cli I get: 12013 16965 15732 0 14:13 pts/6 00:00:00 grep myscriptname –  Cratylus Aug 9 '13 at 12:13

I suposse your perl script is named "myscriptname".

When you run this script, you have a new process (perl myscriptname.pl), and it's showed by the ps -ef command. The other one is related to the grep command (it has the text you are looking for)

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I updated OP for this.It is not the case –  Cratylus Aug 9 '13 at 11:58

@fedorqui's answer is right on -- the grep is matching its own invocation in the process table, and perhaps that of its parent shell, too, though timing issues mean this does not always happen from the CLI.

However, another approach, avoiding grep in favor of perl, would be:

my $count = () = qx(ps -e -o cmd) =~ /myscriptname/mg;
# Now $count tells you the number of times myscriptname appears in the process table

See this answer for why the empty parens are used above. Note, too, that you don't need the full ps output (-f), you just want to match on the command name (-o cmd).

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+1. But I don't fully agree with your explanation. I think now that the count is 2 because it counts the grep itself and the spawned shell having grep as its argument –  Cratylus Aug 10 '13 at 8:17
    
@Cratylus, yes, good clarification; I'll update to reflect that. –  pilcrow Aug 10 '13 at 13:44

Take a look at the pgrep and the pkill commands. These are standard Linux commands are are way easier to use than trying to do a ps and then a grep.

Also, if you do use ps, take a look at the -o options. These let you display the columns you want, and give you a way to strip out the heading.

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