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Hi so it's difficult to explain this properly in the title, but firstly let me start by explaining my data. I have 40 lists stored within a list with a form such as this:

data[0] = [[value1 value2 value3,80],[value1,90],[value1 value3,60],[value2 value3,70]]
data[1] = [[value2,40],[value1 value2 value3,90]]
data[2] = [[value1 value2,80],[value1,50],[value1 value3,20]]
   .
   .
   .

Now I am expecting an output such as this:

data[0] = [[value1 value2 value3,80],[value1,90],[value1 value3,60],[value2 value3,70],[value2,0],[value1 value2,0]]
data[1] = [[value2,40],[value1 value2 value3,90],[value1,0],[value1 value3,0],[value2 value3,0],[value1 value2,0]]
data[2] = [[value1 value2,80],[value1,50],[value1 value3,20],[value1 value2 value3,0],[value2 value3,0],[value2,0]]    

I know this is a bit complicated to read, but I wanted to make sure a good demo of the data is there. So basically all lists need to have all possible combinations of the values present in all the lists, if the combination isn't present in that list as standard then it's frequency (the second field) is 0.

Thanks for any help, please bear in mind this is the intersection of 40 different lists and thus needs to be fast and efficient. I'm not sure how best to do this...

EDIT: I also don't know all the 'values', I have just written 3 different values here (value1, value2, value3) for simplicity. In my project I have no idea what the values are or how many different ones there are (I know there are at least a few thousand)

EDIT 2: Here is some real input data, I don't have real output data but I will try and work it out:

data[0] = [['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80 protocol:TCP syslog_priority:Info', '39.7769'], ['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80 protocol:TCP', '39.7769'], ['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80 syslog_priority:Info', '39.7769'], ['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80', '39.7769'], ['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http protocol:TCP syslog_priority:Info', '39.7769']]


data[1] = [['syslog_priority:Info', '100'], ['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 syslog_priority:Info destination_service:http destination_port:80 protocol:TCP', '43.8362'], ['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 syslog_priority:Info destination_service:http destination_port:80', '43.8362'], ['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 syslog_priority:Info destination_service:http protocol:TCP', '43.8362'], ['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 syslog_priority:Info destination_service:http', '43.8362']]


data[2] = [['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 destination_service:http syslog_priority:Info protocol:TCP', '43.9506'], ['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 destination_service:http syslog_priority:Info', '43.9506'], ['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 destination_service:http protocol:TCP', '43.9506'], ['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 destination_service:http', '43.9506'], ['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 syslog_priority:Info protocol:TCP', '43.9506']]
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1  
can you tell us what you have tried? –  amadain Aug 9 '13 at 12:30
    
So basically I'm not sure how to approach this, I know how to do it for two lists using list intersection or converting to sets however this will be slow if I then loop it over all 40 possible combinations of lists. –  James Elder Aug 9 '13 at 12:32
    
I also considered reading all the lists and finding all the possible unique value combinations (removing duplicates), and then going through each list checking if each combination is there and if not adding it with frequency 0, but again i'm sure this is going to be a slow and long method... –  James Elder Aug 9 '13 at 12:33
2  
Might I suggest, you create an example with just 3 simple lists, of real data, which real output... that can be copied/pasted so people can play with it... I'm completely flummoxed as to what you want, and your comment on user2387370's answer, has I believe just complicated your question further... –  Jon Clements Aug 9 '13 at 12:44
    
I will add real data now but I believe it will complicate it further... Thanks for the suggestion, let me know if it helps! –  James Elder Aug 9 '13 at 12:47

4 Answers 4

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Well given your comments I would use sets as already suggested

first loop through your list to build a set of each possible string

possible_strings = set()
for row in mydata:
   for item in row:
       possible_string.add(item[0])

So possible_strings has all possible strings in your data

Now you need to inspect each row for a string, if it does not exist you need to append it to the row with a frequency of 0

my_new_data = []
for row in mydata:
    row_strings = set(item[0] for item in row)
    missing_strings = possible_strings - row_strings
    for item in list(missing_strings):
         new_item = []
         new_item.append(item)
         new_item.append(0)
         row.append(new_item)
     row.sort()
     my_new_data.append(row)

The reason I would use sets is that you do not have to do any lookup and the items are strings so they can be members of a set. There are ways to speed this up (condense the code) but I like to lay things out so I can see clearly what I am doing. Unless I made a typo (and I have already corrected 3) this code worked on my computer

Here are the unsorted results

newrow*************
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80 protocol:TCP syslog_priority:Info', '39.7769']
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80 protocol:TCP', '39.7769']
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80 syslog_priority:Info', '39.7769']
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80', '39.7769']
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http protocol:TCP syslog_priority:Info', '39.7769']
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 syslog_priority:Info destination_service:http destination_port:80', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 syslog_priority:Info destination_service:http', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 syslog_priority:Info protocol:TCP', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 destination_service:http syslog_priority:Info protocol:TCP', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 destination_service:http syslog_priority:Info', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 syslog_priority:Info destination_service:http destination_port:80 protocol:TCP', 0]
['syslog_priority:Info', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 syslog_priority:Info destination_service:http protocol:TCP', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 destination_service:http protocol:TCP', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 destination_service:http', 0]
newrow*************
['syslog_priority:Info', '100']
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 syslog_priority:Info destination_service:http destination_port:80 protocol:TCP', '43.8362']
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 syslog_priority:Info destination_service:http destination_port:80', '43.8362']
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 syslog_priority:Info destination_service:http protocol:TCP', '43.8362']
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 syslog_priority:Info destination_service:http', '43.8362']
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 syslog_priority:Info protocol:TCP', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80 protocol:TCP', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 destination_service:http syslog_priority:Info', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80 protocol:TCP syslog_priority:Info', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http protocol:TCP syslog_priority:Info', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 destination_service:http syslog_priority:Info protocol:TCP', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 destination_service:http protocol:TCP', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 destination_service:http', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80 syslog_priority:Info', 0]
newrow*************
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 destination_service:http syslog_priority:Info protocol:TCP', '43.9506']
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 destination_service:http syslog_priority:Info', '43.9506']
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 destination_service:http protocol:TCP', '43.9506']
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 destination_service:http', '43.9506']
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_port:80 syslog_priority:Info protocol:TCP', '43.9506']
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 syslog_priority:Info destination_service:http destination_port:80', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 syslog_priority:Info destination_service:http', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80 protocol:TCP', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80 protocol:TCP syslog_priority:Info', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 syslog_priority:Info destination_service:http destination_port:80 protocol:TCP', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http protocol:TCP syslog_priority:Info', 0]
['syslog_priority:Info', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 syslog_priority:Info destination_service:http protocol:TCP', 0]
['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80 syslog_priority:Info', 0]
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks, this sounds like what I need, sorry I didn't understand fully at first as I have never used dictionaries before, but after Daniel's answer I can understand it a bit better... –  James Elder Aug 9 '13 at 13:08
    
I have just seen your edit and I this is not what I am looking to do. Basically if you take data[0] and the first item in that list: ['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80 protocol:TCP syslog_priority:Info', '39.7769'] so basically this means that the string "destination_ip10..." occurs 39.7769 in the data that this count was performed upon. –  James Elder Aug 9 '13 at 18:44
    
Continuing from previous comment Now in data[1] this frequency might be 0, and therefore I need to append this item to data[1] with a frequency of 0 i.e. ['destination_ip:10.32.0.100 destination_service:http destination_port:80 protocol:TCP syslog_priority:Info', '0'] so that every data[i] contains every possible string along with a frequency... I believe your first answer does this. –  James Elder Aug 9 '13 at 18:44
    
Thanks after testing your code I found two errors (line 3 second code block should be ')' instead of']', line 9 second code block missing ')'). Can't edit myself as not enough character changes... –  James Elder Aug 9 '13 at 20:06
1  
see the edit, since you are sorting on the first value in each item it will sort without any additional complications - I am not going to reload the data though it did work –  PyNEwbie Aug 9 '13 at 20:39

Sounds like you could use sets:

>>> {1, 2, 3, 4, 5} & {2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7} & {3, 4, 5}
{3, 4, 5}

& is the intersection operator for sets. Get a set of a list (this will remove duplicate elements with set(mylist).

Edit: In the light of your comments, it seems what you need is some sort of union (the union operator being |), not an intersection. Here is a function that does what you wanted in your comment for 2 lists of lists:

def function(first, second):
    first_set = {tuple(i) for i in first}
    second_set = {tuple(i) for i in second}
    return (first_set | {(i[0], 0) for i in second_set},
            second_set | {(i[0], 0) for i in first_set})

>>> a = [(1,60),(3,90)]
>>> b = [(2,30),(4,50)]
>>> x, y = function(a, b)
>>> print(x)
{(2, 0), (3, 90), (1, 60), (4, 0)}
>>> print(y)
{(3, 0), (4, 50), (1, 0), (2, 30)}
share|improve this answer
    
Thanks but the thing is I have 40 different lists, all with different "missing elements" which I need to insert into the relevant lists. So for example here I would have something like {1, 2, 3}, {2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7}, {3, 4, 5} I would want to: insert {4,5,6,7} into the first, {1} into the second and {1,2,6,7} into the third and again this is made more difficult by the fact I am not dealing with single digits in my list, I'm dealing with combinations i.e. {1 2, 1 3, 1 2 3} –  James Elder Aug 9 '13 at 12:43
    
So at the end all the lists are the same? That sounds like a union, not an intersection. The union operator is |. –  sweeneyrod Aug 9 '13 at 12:46
    
Yeah so at the end all lists need to have all values. But I'm not sure how I would do a union on the first value in each field of all lists and set the second value of each added field to 0. i.e. the union of {[1,60],[3,90]} and {[2,30],[4,50]} should give out {[1,60],[2,0],[3,90],[4,0]} for the first and {[1,0],[2,30],[3,0],[4,50]} for the second and they need to remain as separate lists like this... –  James Elder Aug 9 '13 at 12:57
1  
See the edit to the question: –  sweeneyrod Aug 9 '13 at 13:30

It sounds like you want dictionaries, and then you want to compare the keys, which are lists of "values" as you have them, but not the dictionary values, which are frequencies. Restructuring your data as dictionaries isn't necessary, of course, but it might make more sense.

Now, for an actual answer: make a new list/dictionary just to put together one full list of all the keys/"lists of values". Then, go through a second time and add the elements that are missing to the lists that are missing them. The outer loops go through 40 times. The first outer loop is O(n*2), where n is the total number of unique keys, although I imagine the average case will be less than n*2. The second outer loop is O(n**2), as well.

I hope that's not too brute forcey. At least it's better than comparing data[n] to data[n+m] for n 0-40... That'd be 40**2 for the outer loops... which is still a constant, but, obviously a bigger one than 80.

share|improve this answer
    
Thanks from what you have said this sounds like what I need. I haven't used dictionaries before but I'll have a read and try. –  James Elder Aug 9 '13 at 13:07

Correct me if I'm wrong, but I think the best solution to this involves a dictionary for each desired output, and a master set of keys. A set will basically store every value without allowing for duplicates. With your above example I would do this:

master_set = set()
for current_list in list_of_lists:
    master_set |= [entry[0] for entry in current_list] 

Where |= is effectively the union operator for sets.

Once you have that set, you're looking to construct a dictionary for each entry that either contains the relevant value, or a zero. First I would construct a dictionary, then I would just add results for absent items.

full_dictionary = {}
for entry in master_set:
    full_dictionary[entry] = [thing[1] for thing in current_list if thing[0] == entry]

And then just generate the full dictionary for each list you've got.

Alternately, if you have choice over how your data is coming in, or just want to restructure it reasonably I would suggest using a dictionary comprehension, which would just make this whole thing simpler:

new_dict = {value[0]: value[1] for value in current_list}

I'm also having a little trouble interpreting the question, but let me know if that's not accurate and I can revise it.

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