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Someone asked me to sort an array, which I did as follows. Now we're fighting over which sorting technique this is. He's classifying it as bubble after explaining me the different sorting techniques he knows about, but I think it's not! But it does sort!

C code:

void sort(void){

int a[9]={4,2,1,3,5,7,5,6,8};
int i,j,temp;

for(i=0;i<9;i++)
{
    for(j=0;j<i;j++)
    {
        if(a[j] > a[i])
        {
            temp = a[i];
            a[i] = a[j];
            a[j] = temp;
        }
    }

}

for(i=0;i<9;i++)
{
    printf("\n%d",a[i]);
}
}

This is bubble, according to me which he agrees to, but also classifies the former as the same. I mean there's got to be a name for that!

for(i=0;i<9;i++)
{
    for(j=0;j<8;j++)
    {
        if(a[j] > a[j+1])
        {
            temp = a[j+1];
            a[j+1] = a[j];
                a[j] = temp;
        }
    }    

}
share|improve this question
up vote 3 down vote accepted

It looks more like a variant of insertion sort to me. In fact, the key is to remark that after each step of the outer loop, the beginning of the array (up to index i-1) is sorted. Then, the inner loop will only do comparisons until j reaches the first index k where a[k]>a[i], which is the place where you want to insert a[i]. After that, you'll always (well not really always if there are duplicate elements) swap values, since a[k]<=a[k+1]<=...<=a[i-1], effectively moving the elements to the right after the insertion point, like in the canonical insertion sort. The code below contains annotations that formalize that reasoning so that it can be proved by the Frama-C tool (NB: the assertions are only there to help the tool complete the proofs, what really matters are the loop invariant).

/*@ predicate sorted{L}(int* a, int n) =
       \forall integer i,j; 0<=i<=j<n ==> a[i]<=a[j];
*/

/*@ requires \valid(a+(0..n-1));
    requires n > 0;
    assigns a[0..n-1];
    ensures sorted(a,n);
 */
void sort(int* a, int n) {

int i,j,temp;

/*@ loop invariant sorted(a,i);
    loop invariant 0<=i<=n;
    loop assigns i,j,temp,a[0..n-1];
    loop variant n-i;
 */
for(i=0;i<n;i++)
{
  /*@ loop invariant sorted(a,i);
      loop invariant 0<=j<=i;
      loop invariant \forall integer k; 0<=k<j ==> a[k] <= a[i];
      loop assigns j,temp,a[0..j-1],a[i];
      loop variant i-j;
  */
    for(j=0;j<i;j++)
    {
        if(a[j] > a[i])
        {
          //@ assert \forall integer k; 0<=k<j ==> a[k]<=a[i];
          //@ assert \forall integer k; j<=k<i ==> a[i]<a[k];
            temp = a[i];
            a[i] = a[j];
            a[j] = temp;
          //@ assert \forall integer k; 0<=k<j ==> a[k]<=a[j];
          //@ assert \forall integer k; j<=k<=i ==> a[j]<=a[k];
          //@ assert \forall integer k,l; 0<=k<=l<j ==> a[k]<=a[l];
          //@ assert \forall integer k,l; j<k<=l<i ==> a[k]<=a[l];
       }
    }

}
}
share|improve this answer

It's most similar to bubble sort. Read more here: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bubble_sort.

Your loops are different, but it still works because you iterate from j to i in each pass, instead of iterating over the entire collection.

For example:

First iteration: i = 0. Second loop doesn't execute.

{4,2,1,3,5,7,5,6,8}

Second iteration: i = 1. Second loop comapres 4 and 2, switches them.

{2,4,1,3,5,7,5,6,8}

Third iteration: i = 2. Second loop compares 2 and 1, switches. Compares 4 and 1, makes a switch.

{1,2,4,3,5,7,5,6,8}

Fourth iteration: i = 3. Second loop compares 1 and 3, no switch. Compares 2 and 3, no switch. Compares 4 and 3, switches.

{1,2,3,4,5,7,5,6,8}

Fifth iteration: i = 4. Second loop compares 1 and 5, no switch. Compares 2 and 5, 3 and 5, 4 and 5, no switches.

{1,2,3,4,5,7,5,6,8}

Sixth iteration: i = 5. Compares 1 and 7, 2 and 7, 3 and 7, 4 and 7, 5 and 7, no switches.

{1,2,3,4,5,7,5,6,8}

Seventh iteration: i = 6. Compares 1 and 5, 2 and 5, 3 and 5, 4 and 5, 5 and 5, no switches. Compares 7 and 5, switches.

{1,2,3,4,5,5,7,6,8}

Eighth iteration: i = 7. Compares 1 and 6, 2 and 6, 3 and 6, 4 and 6, 5 and 6, 5 and 6, no switches. Compares 7 and 6, switches.

{1,2,3,4,5,5,6,7,8}

Ninth iteration: i = 8. Compares 1 and 8, 2 and 8, 3 and 8, 4 and 8, 5 and 8, 5 and 8, 6 and 8, 7 and 8, no switches. Sorting done.

{1,2,3,4,5,5,6,7,8}

So, your loop differs from bubble sort in that it compares the current item with the last item of the collection, but the technique still works. Good job, I've never seen this variation before and didn't think it would sort properly before testing it out.

share|improve this answer
    
Doesn't BubbleSort just switch adjacent values? – Dahaka Aug 9 '13 at 12:49
    
It's interesting how Bubble Sort is almost always the first algorithm people come up with when they never learned about sorting algorithms. – Philipp Aug 9 '13 at 12:50
    
So Jake Wilson, can we say this is an optimized bubble sort? Or a different flavor of it? – Chinmay Shah Aug 9 '13 at 12:53
    
@robery I'd say different, but not optimized, because it takes the exact same number of operations. – Dahaka Aug 9 '13 at 12:54
1  
@Juhana: Bubble sort (including the code you linked) swaps two adjacent entries whenever they're out of order. In the OP's code, i and j are more independent (the main constraint being that in the inner loop, 0 <= j < i < 9). – cHao Aug 9 '13 at 15:34

I would say this is not bubble sort. To me, one of the defining characteristics of bubble sort is that you are swapping adjacent entries. Your algorithm doesn't do that.

That being said, I'm not sure what it's called. And note that it's O(n^2) like bubble sort, although it should have 1/2 the number of iterations of bubble sort on average. So I would say that you've developed a new O(n^2) sorting algorithm that has half the work of bubble sort. We'll call it the "Robery" algorithm. Unfortunately no one is too impressed with O(n^2) sorting algorithms these days, so don't expect a Wikipedia page to show up any time soon...

share|improve this answer

It's was, but usully we do sort like this

for(int i = 0;i < 9; i ++ )
 for (int j = i +1 ; j < 9 ;j++)
 {
     if(a[i] >a[j])
       {
         int temp = a[i];
         a[i] = a[j];
         a[j] = temp;

       }
 }

but it was same . forgive my English.

share|improve this answer

Bubble sorts compare only adjacent elements, so this isn't be a bubble sort variation.

I agree with @Virgile: this is a variation of the insertion sort. The outer loop at each iteration takes a[i] and the sorted subarray before it, and leaves the subarray a[0..i] in sorted order: this is the insertion sort invariant.

The difference between this and a typical implementation of insertion sort is how the index i is used in the inner loop once the right place for a[i] has been found. The portion of the array to the right is shifted one place to the right by repeatedly swapping each index with index i; in other words a[i] is used as temporary storage. A typical implementation would use a local variable, but this works just as well.

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