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Lets suppose you want to make an interface of the class Derived and it looks like this:

class Derived : public Base
{
   public:
      foo();
}

class Base
{
   public:
      tii();
      //many other methods
}

How would you do the Interface? How can you make Base::tii visible (and also other methods) to this new interface?

class IDerived
{
   public:
      virtual foo() = 0;
      // should I declare here tii() as a pure virtual function?
      // but by doing it now there is ambiguity!
}

What is a good strategy?

The new Derived class should look like this....

class Derived : public Base, public IDerived
{
    //implement the real thing    
}
share|improve this question
    
Interfaces are not done this way. –  Uchia Itachi Aug 9 '13 at 12:57
4  
You are doing things backwards: the class should derive from the interface, not the other way round. –  Jon Aug 9 '13 at 12:57
    
Sorry you are right.. I corrected it a little bit. –  Lesswire Aug 9 '13 at 13:03

2 Answers 2

up vote 1 down vote accepted

Your example is doing things backwards: the interface should be defined independently of any concrete classes with all pure virtual methods:

class IDerived
{
   public:
      virtual void foo() = 0;
      virtual ~IDerived() {} // don't forget to include a virtual destructor
}

And the concrete classes will derive publicly from the interface:

class Derived : public Base, public IDerived
{
   public:
      void foo();
}

If you want IDerived to also declare methods that Derived inherits from Base, you can have Derived explicitly implement the method by calling the inherited implementation:

class Derived : public Base, public IDerived
{
   public:
      void foo();
      void bar() { Base::bar(); } 
}
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But then there will be ambiguity between IDerived::tii and Base::tii –  Lesswire Aug 9 '13 at 13:04
    
@Lesswire: I 'm not sure what you mean. There is no IDerived::tii. –  Jon Aug 9 '13 at 13:05
    
I mean right now the method Derived::tii() is not visible from IDerived. If I add a pure virtual function to IDerived then there will be an ambiguity. –  Lesswire Aug 9 '13 at 13:08
    
@Lesswire: I see now. Expanded the answer, check it out. –  Jon Aug 9 '13 at 13:10

At front, I dislike interfaces (they are grown by other languages than c++). Anyway, if you have one, it should be complete: Hence have the 'tii() as a pure virtual function'. To resolve the conflict rewrite that function in 'Derived' (forward to Base::tii).

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