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I am trying to figure out how to simplify the following

let's say I have 2 entity classes

public class A
{
    public int Id { get; set; }
    public string Name { get; set; }
    public string City { get; set; }
}

AND

public class B
{
    public int Id { get; set; } 
    public string Nom { get; set; }
    public string Ville { get; set; }
} 

classes that are similar, but not the same.

each class has a repository classes it uses for CRUD Operations, for example...

public class RepA
{
    public static List<A> GetAll()
    {
        List<A> list = new List<A>();

        A a1 = new A() {Id=1, Name="First A", City="Boston"};
        A a2 = new A() {Id=2, Name="First B", City="Chicago"};
        A a3 = new A() {Id=3, Name="First C", City="San Francisco"};

        list.Add(a1);
        list.Add(a2);
        list.Add(a3);
        return list;
    }

    public static void SaveAll(List<A> list)
    {
        foreach (A a in list)
        {
              Console.WriteLine("Saved Id = {0} Name = {1} City={2}", 
                  a.Id, a.Name, a.City);
        }
    }

}

AND

public class RepB
    {
        public static List<B> GetAll()
        {
            List<B> list = new List<B>();

            B b1 = new B() {Id=1, Nom="Second A", Ville="Montreal"};
            B b2 = new B() {Id=2, Nom="Second B", Ville="Paris"};
            B b3 = new B() {Id=3, Nom="Second C", Ville="New Orleans"};

            list.Add(b1);
            list.Add(b2);
            list.Add(b3);
            return list;
        }

    public static void SaveAll(List<B> list)
    {
        foreach (B b in list)
        {
            Console.WriteLine("Saved Id = {0} Name = {1} City={2}", b.Id, 
                    b.Nom, b.Ville);
        }
    }

}

How would I go about making anonymous call to my repository without having to resort to this, because in my real world example, i have 100 repositories, and not 2.

void Main()
{
    ChosenType chosentype    = RandomChosenType(); //A or B
    switch (chosentype)
    {
        case ChosenType.A:
            var listA = RepA.GetAll();
            RepA.SaveAll(listA);
            break;
        case ChosenType.B:
            var listB = RepB.GetAll();
            RepB.SaveAll(listB);
            break;
            default:
            break;
    }
}
share|improve this question
4  
It looks like you are trying to store a separate table per localization - not really a good idea. It's best to be consistent at the backend and only localize for display purposes. –  James Aug 9 '13 at 13:01
1  
Localizing the data structures does seem like a bad idea. Not sure what you would gain from this. It will just make your code difficult to write and maintain. Are programmers really expected to be able to read every language? –  Tim B Aug 9 '13 at 13:05
    
Get all the Classes put it in a list and call the common methods as per Class selected pass that one in Switch and make LIST as Generic Keyword and append list +"ClassName" ... –  Aravind Aug 9 '13 at 13:07
    
What is ChosenType? Do you actually have an enum of every type? How is the type determined (in other words, what does RandomChosenType represent)? –  nmclean Aug 9 '13 at 13:10
1  
My example shows localizing, but disregard the name of fields, i was trying to be quick in my example. but the tables contain different columns and type, there are not localized versions of each other –  SerenityNow Aug 9 '13 at 13:12

6 Answers 6

Make a base class or use an interface:

public interface IBase<T>
{
     List<T> GetAll();
     void SaveAll(List<T> items);
}

public class RepA : IBase<RepA> 
{
    public List<RepA> GetAll() { return new List<RepA>(); }
    public void SaveAll(List<RepA> repA) { }
}

public class RepB : IBase<RepB> 
{
    public List<RepB> GetAll() { return new List<RepB>(); }
    public void SaveAll(List<RepB> repB) { }
}

void Main() 
{
    IBase chosenType = RandomChosenType();
    var list = chosenType.GetAll();
}
share|improve this answer
    
This would only work if IBase was generic, GetAll/SaveAll use strongly typed lists. –  James Aug 9 '13 at 13:02
    
GetAll should return List<T> –  BlackBear Aug 9 '13 at 13:09
    
@BlackBear - adjusted. –  Darren Davies Aug 9 '13 at 13:10
    
This won't work. There needs to be a non-generic IBase which returns a non-generic list. Otherwise RandomChosenType would also need to be generic and be called with a specific type, which defeats the purpose. –  nmclean Aug 9 '13 at 13:20
    
I don't know if i understand. GetAll now returns a list of RepA, which is my repository class, and not A, which is my entity class... –  SerenityNow Aug 9 '13 at 13:37

You should use a single generic repository. The operations should be handled by injected delegates. A repository could look like this:

public class GenericRepositoryExample
{

    public void Save<T>(IList<T> persons, SaveDelegate<T> save)
    {
        foreach (T person in persons)
        {
            Console.WriteLine(save(person));
        }
    }
}

Note that the save delegate is passed to the Save method. The SaveDelegate in your example could be declared as:

public delegate string SaveDelegate<T>(T input);

For ease, I have created a HelperClass containing the delegated functions. In real life helper classes should generally be avoided if possible.

public static class HelperClass
{
    public static string FrenchSave(B frenchInput)
    {

        string result = string.Format("ID = {0}; Name = {1}; City = {2}", frenchInput.Id, frenchInput.Nom, frenchInput.ville);
        return result;
    }

    public static string EnglishSave(A englishInput)
    {
        string result = string.Format("ID = {0}; Name = {1}; City = {2}", englishInput.Id, englishInput.name, englishInput.city);
        return result;
    }

}

To illustrate the use of this setup, I have created the following unit test:

  [Test]
    public void TestGenericRepository()
    {
        IList<A> aList = new List<A>();

        aList.Add(new A() { Id = 1, name = "George", city = "Chicago"});
        aList.Add(new A() { Id = 2, name = "Bill", city = "Toledo" });


        List<B> bList = new List<B>(); 

        bList.Add(new B() {Id= 1, Nom = "Nathalie", ville = "Paris"});
        bList.Add(new B() {Id = 2, Nom = "Michelle", ville = "Lyon"});


        GenericRepositoryExample repository = new GenericRepositoryExample();

        repository.Save<A>(aList,HelperClass.EnglishSave);

        repository.Save<B>(bList,HelperClass.FrenchSave);

    }
share|improve this answer
    
good, but i still need to know A and the type.... so if i have 100 repositories, my implementation will still require 100 different calls or am I missing something What I would like is a setup that allows me to write Save(list) and base on the <T> in the list, it will know which save to call and doing this without switch –  SerenityNow Aug 9 '13 at 15:02
    
@RedSoxFred. I am not sure what you mean. Do you want to be able to save a list containing both A's and B's? –  Morten Aug 9 '13 at 15:11
    
I want a save to save either, choose at runtime which save method needs to be called based on type of entity inside list –  SerenityNow Aug 9 '13 at 15:28
    
This is what my example does. As long as your A, B and other classes don't have a common interface, you need a save for each. –  Morten Aug 9 '13 at 19:49

You can make your repositories implement an interface, say IGetAllSaveAll. Then you can store your repositories in a list, and cast them to that interface. That way you'll be able to call the GetAll function on all of them: (actually the first interface isn't mandatory, you could directly write it as IEnumerable<object> GetAll()...)

interface IGetAllSaveAll<T>
{
    IEnumerable<T> GetAll();
    void SaveAll(IEnumerable<T> obj);
}

you'll need to have a base interface:

interface IGetAllSaveAll : IGetAllSaveAll<object>

and to use it:

public class RepA: IGetAllSaveAll
public class RepB: IGetAllSaveAll
....

Then you can keep a dictionnary of all these repositories somewhere:

Dictionnary<Type, IGetAllSaveAll> myDic;

Of course you'll still have to add your repositories to your dictionnary:

myDic.Add(typeof(A), new RepA());

And then to call it:

Type t = RandomChosenType();
myDic[t].GetAll();
share|improve this answer
    
Probably safe to assume IGetAllSaveAll<IEnumerable<T>> in this instance. –  James Aug 9 '13 at 13:04
    
@James actually I made it IEnumerable but on the methods, seems better –  ppetrov Aug 9 '13 at 13:05
    
oops that was my mistake, that's what I actually meant haha! –  James Aug 9 '13 at 13:14
    
ppetrov, i modified my code to implement your suggested solution. the problem i have now is that i couldn't leave my methods static and there i need to create an instance of the repository. Unless I am missing something, this looks to me like I am just moving the switch a little further down the road –  SerenityNow Aug 9 '13 at 13:27
    
@RedSoxFred Sorry my mistake, didn't see the static keyword... Well this still could work if you use the singleton pattern for these repositories –  ppetrov Aug 9 '13 at 13:30

The code you posted uses static methods. In order to implement an interface, you will need instance methods. Unless you want to use reflection (should be avoided in my opinion), these methods need to be ignorant of the type. Something like this:

public interface IRepository {
    IEnumerable<object> GetAll();
}

And in RepA:

IEnumerable<object> IRepository.GetAll() {
    return RepA.GetAll();
}

Instead of storing types, each of your menu selections can just contain an instance of the appropriate repository class in a field of type IRepository. After calling GetAll on one of the instances, you can later cast the result to the specific type (like List<A>) if necessary.

share|improve this answer
    
I think we may be onto something here :) let me try that –  SerenityNow Aug 9 '13 at 13:41

Try this approach based on reflection and some assumptions about your classes' structures:

static void Main(string[] args)
{
    var types = Assembly.GetExecutingAssembly().Modules
        .SelectMany(m => m.GetTypes())
        .Where(t =>
            t.GetMethod("GetAll") != null &&
            t.GetMethod("SaveAll") != null &&
            t.GetMethod("GetAll").ReturnType.IsGenericType)
        .Select(t =>
            new
            {
                RepositoryType = t,
                ReturnTypeArgument = 
                    t.GetMethod("GetAll").ReturnType.GenericTypeArguments[0]
            }
            )
        .ToList();

    (new List<dynamic> { new A(), new B() }).ToList().ForEach(chosenType =>
    {
        var association = types
            .FirstOrDefault(t => 
                t.ReturnTypeArgument == chosenType.GetType());
        if (association == null)
            return;
        var repType = association.RepositoryType;
        dynamic list = repType.GetMethod("GetAll")
            .Invoke(chosenType, new object[] { });
        repType.GetMethod("SaveAll")
            .Invoke(chosenType, new object[] { list });
    });
}
share|improve this answer

Given your exact scenario, where you've got an enum representing each of the possible data types, here's something that may work.

Map each enum value to a repository type using an attribute. Each repository inherits from a generic class, which implements a basic interface which is not strongly typed. The repo methods change from static to instance members. The base repo class has to do casting to cast object to the appropriate type and back, but the actual repository implementations are strongly typed.

You can take this a step further and try to cache some of the reflection using expression trees so you only have to do it once, but it depends on how optimized you really need to make it.

public enum ChosenType {
    [Repo(typeof(RepA))] A = 0,
    [Repo(typeof(RepB))] B = 1
}

public class RepoAttribute : Attribute {
    public RepoAttribute(Type repoType) { RepoType = repoType; }
    public Type RepoType { get; set; }
}

class Program
{
    static void Main()
    {
        ChosenType chosentype = RandomChosenType(); //A or B

        // Make an instance of the appropriate repo based on the mapping
        // to the enum value.
        // This is a moderately expensive call, and there's room for improvement
        // by using expression trees and caching lambda expressions.
        var repo = (IRepo)Activator.CreateInstance(
            ((RepoAttribute)typeof(ChosenType).GetMember(chosentype.ToString())
                .Single().GetCustomAttributes(typeof(RepoAttribute), false).Single()
            ).RepoType);

        var list = repo.GetAll();
        repo.SaveAll(list);

        Console.Read();
    }

    static Random _rand = new Random();
    static ChosenType RandomChosenType()
    {
        return (ChosenType)_rand.Next(0, 2);
    }
}

public class A { /* No change */ }
public class B { /* No change */ }

public interface IRepo {
    List<object> GetAll();
    void SaveAll(List<object> list);
}

public abstract class Repo<T> : IRepo {
    List<object> IRepo.GetAll() {
        return GetAll().Cast<object>().ToList();
    }

    void IRepo.SaveAll(List<object> list) {
        SaveAll(list.Cast<T>().ToList());
    }

    public abstract List<T> GetAll();
    public abstract void SaveAll(List<T> list);
}

public class RepA : Repo<A> {
    public override List<A> GetAll() { /* No change except the signature */ }
    public override void SaveAll(List<A> list) { /* No change except the signature */ }
}
public class RepB : Repo<B> {
    public override List<B> GetAll() { /* No change except the signature */ }
    public override void SaveAll(List<B> list) { /* No change except the signature */ }
}
share|improve this answer

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