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I want to find all multiples of 3 given a certain number, and also find the remainder.

So for example:

Given the number 10 : multiples of 3 = {3;6;9} + remainder = 1

Given the number 11 : multiples of 3 = {3;6;9} + remainder = 2

The algorithm I have so far (but not code) goes like this:

  1. Check if X is a multiple of 3 - Yes - return multiples (no remainder);
  2. No? is x-1 a multiple of 3 - Yes - return multiples (1 remainder);
  3. No? is x-2 a multiple of 3 - Yes - return multples (2 remainder);

Is there a better way to do this, using less code?

Edit: 2 more things, I'm only looking for 3 - so this could be a const. Also any number smaller than 3: 2, 1 and 0 - I don't mind having additional logic for that.

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3  
This is such low-hanging fruit, I'm not surprised to see 5 answers in 1 minute. Way to pitch a slow one, @JL.! –  Jesse Smith Aug 9 '13 at 13:05
3  
@JesseSmith Questions like this are like catnip to programmers I think - we just can't resist answering them. –  RB. Aug 9 '13 at 13:09

10 Answers 10

up vote 11 down vote accepted

Integer division (/) and modulus (%) are your friends here:

var multiples = num / 3;
var remainder = num % 3;
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Wow, that looks awesome - exactly what I need - thanks.... –  JL. Aug 9 '13 at 13:04
3  
That suprises me considering the way your question is worded. I'm confused now! –  F.B. ten Kate Aug 9 '13 at 13:12
    
@F.B.tenKate - Sure, nothing like a complete solution, but OP seems to have been missing some basic building blocks. Sometimes our job is to teach a man how to fish... –  Oded Aug 9 '13 at 14:00
1  
Agreed, I gave the same answer you did (deleted it by now since like 9 others did the same) but ye, the way he worded his question Leppie's question is the most complete. Regardless it's good to teach a guy to Fish... or... in this case, Math. –  F.B. ten Kate Aug 9 '13 at 14:02
    
@F.B.tenKate - I think, in this case - C# operators ;) –  Oded Aug 9 '13 at 14:03
IEnumerable<int> Foo(int n, int k)
{
  int m = k;
  while (m <= n)
  {
    yield return m;
    m += k;
  }

  yield return m - n;
}
share|improve this answer
    
+1 for yield :) –  RB. Aug 9 '13 at 13:10
2  
Ye, this answer seems the nicest to be honest (after reading the question 5 times :x) –  F.B. ten Kate Aug 9 '13 at 13:11

x = given number
y = loop number

have y loop from 0 to x while increasing it by 3 every time.
if y > x then the remender is (x-(y-3))

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3  
Wow, I really hope no one does this. –  F.B. ten Kate Aug 9 '13 at 13:05
2  
Heh, I just gave the same, IMO what the OP is asking for :) –  leppie Aug 9 '13 at 13:05
3  
@F.B.tenKate why? he want's all number between 0 and x that are multiple of 3 and the remainder –  the_lotus Aug 9 '13 at 13:06
1  
@F.B.tenKate: You did not read the question correctly. –  leppie Aug 9 '13 at 13:07
1  
@F.B.tenKate How doesn't want the count of numbers - he wants the list of numbers. –  RB. Aug 9 '13 at 13:07

You can use the divider / and the modulus %

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/3b1ff23f.aspx

10 / 3 = 3

http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/0w4e0fzs.aspx

10 % 3 = 1
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int number = 10;
int divisor = 3;

List<int> numbers;

// Find all the numbers by incrementing i by the divisor.
for(int i = 0; i < number; i += divisor)
{
    numbers.Add(i);
}

// Find the remainder using modulus operator.
int remainder = number % divisor;
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You can simply enumerate the output values

  public static IEnumerable<int> GetMultiples(int value, int divisor) {
    // Be care of negative and zero values...
    if ((value <= 0) || (divisor <= 0))
      yield break;

    // Multiplications
    for (int i = 1; i <= value / divisor; ++i)
      yield return i * divisor;

    // Finally, let's return remainder if it's non-zero
    if ((value % divisor) != 0)
      yield return value % divisor;
  }

  ...

  foreach(int item in GetMultiples(10, 3)) { // item will be 3, 6, 9, 1
    ...
  }
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Here's your exact output

private static void Main(string[] args)
    {
        int num = 10;
        int divisor = 3;

        if(num<divisor)
            Console.Write(num + " is less than " + divisor);

        Console.Write("Given the number " + num + " : multiples of " + divisor + " = {");

        for (int i = divisor; i < num; i+=divisor)
            Console.Write((i!=3) ? ";"+i : i.ToString());

        Console.Write("} + remainder = " + num%divisor);

    }

Output

Given the number 10 : multiples of 3 = {3;6;9} + remainder = 1

and checks if input is less than divisor

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1  
I find it odd, that you'd create a variable for 10, making it easily interchangeable with any other number, but not for 3. Just saying. –  Nolonar Aug 9 '13 at 13:12
    
just hammered it out quickly, there ya go –  Jonesy Aug 9 '13 at 13:13

You can use operator modulo

%

But is very slowly if you use a lot...

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This will give you the output you want:

            int num;
            Console.WriteLine("give me a number equal or above 3!");
            int.TryParse(Console.ReadLine(),out num);
            int i = 0;
            List<int> nums = new List<int>();
            i += 3;
            while (i <= num)
            {
                nums.Add(i);
                i += 3;
            }

            Console.Write("Numbers are: ");
            foreach (int y in nums)
            {
                Console.Write(y + " , ");
            }
            Console.WriteLine("The remainder is " + (num - nums[nums.Count - 1]));
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Wasn't LINQ built for EXACTLY for this?

IEnumerable<int> GetMultiples(int max)
{
    return Enumerable.Range(1, max / 3)
                     .Select(p => p * 3)
                     .Concat((max %= 3) == 0 ? new int[0] : new int[] { max });
}
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