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I'm making a helper function for this project I'm working on in which I need to make percentiles out of a set of data.

In some instances, I'll be percentiling a vector of entries, which is fairly easy. In other instances, I'll be percentiling entries in a matrix.

The processes are similar, but different. I'd like to be able to distinguish what is given as an input (whether it's a vector or a matrix) so I know what operation is appropriate.

I thought about doing something with the dimensions of the input. But dim(*vector*) = NULL, but dim(matrix(1:15, 1,15)) = c(1,15) even though that is debatable to be a vector. So I can't use my first idea of

if(length(dim(objects)) == 2){*A MATRIX*}
else{*A VECTOR*}

I considered that I could just add the condition of min(dim(objects)) > 1 to test for a matrix, but I'm thinking there is probably a better option. (And now I'm here...)

Any thoughts?

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you could probably use ?is.vector and ?is.matrix? –  Arun Aug 9 '13 at 13:58
    
This has the same issue of is.matrix(matrix(1,1,2)) = TRUE but it's dimensions are c(1,2) so it technically is still a vector –  jameselmore Aug 9 '13 at 14:02
1  
then maybe: is.vector(x) | min(dim(x)) > 1? –  Arun Aug 9 '13 at 14:04
    
yeah, I think is.vector(x) | min(dim(x)) == 1 should work. I was wondering if there was something better, but it might not get any better haha. Thanks –  jameselmore Aug 9 '13 at 14:08
    
or ncol(x)>1 | nrow(x)>1 should also do the job –  holzben Aug 9 '13 at 14:12
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2 Answers

up vote 4 down vote accepted

Seems like you want to ignore any dimension that only has one level, so drop would be appropriate:

if(is.null(dim(drop(x)))) {
  # do vector stuff
} else {
  # do matrix/array stuff
}
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Thanks! I ended up finding (for this particular problem) a way around all of this. BUT, I didn't know of that function, and it's a good one.. –  jameselmore Aug 9 '13 at 14:23
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Why not use prop.table for the operations? You can get either row or column proportions and if you wnat percentiles you can multiply by 100 and round to the desired accuracy

> m <- matrix(1:9, 3)
> prop.table(m, 1)
           [,1]      [,2]      [,3]
[1,] 0.08333333 0.3333333 0.5833333
[2,] 0.13333333 0.3333333 0.5333333
[3,] 0.16666667 0.3333333 0.5000000
> prop.table(m,2)
          [,1]      [,2]      [,3]
[1,] 0.1666667 0.2666667 0.2916667
[2,] 0.3333333 0.3333333 0.3333333
[3,] 0.5000000 0.4000000 0.3750000

> round(100*prop.table(m, 1), 2) # rounded row percentages
      [,1]  [,2]  [,3]
[1,]  8.33 33.33 58.33
[2,] 13.33 33.33 53.33
[3,] 16.67 33.33 50.00
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