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I am wondering if an infinite loop of including files causes a compiler problem or a linker problem. I tried this :

/* file : try.c */
#include "try1.c"
int main(void) {}

/* file : try1.c */
#include "try.c"
int a(void) { return 0; }

The command to compile is :

gcc -Wall try.c -o try

This obviously causes a very long output (starts like this) :

try.c:5:1: error: expected '=', ',', ';', 'asm' or '__attribute__' before '{' token
In file included from try.c:1:0,
                 from try1.c:1,
                 from try.c:1:
try1.c:4:1: error: expected '=', ',', ';', 'asm' or '__attribute__' before '{' token
In file included from try1.c:1:0,
                 from try.c:1:
try.c:5:1: error: expected '=', ',', ';', 'asm' or '__attribute__' before '{' token
In file included from try.c:1:0:
try1.c:4:1: error: expected '=', ',', ';', 'asm' or '__attribute__' before '{' token
try.c:5:1: error: expected '=', ',', ';', 'asm' or '__attribute__' before '{' token
In file included from try.c:2:0,
                 from try1.c:1,
                 from try.c:1,
                 from try1.c:1,
                 from try.c:1,
                 from try1.c:1,
                 from try.c:1,
                 from try1.c:1,
                 from try.c:1,
                 from try1.c:1,
                   .
                   .
                   etc...

Well, obviously there is an infinite loop here. But when does it occur ? At the compiling process or the linker one? I think you are going to tell me at the compiling process because it will define here more than one function with the same name (because of the loop), but isn't the part that unite files occur at the linker process (And then there are no compilation problem for only one file) ?

Thanks !

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This is what .h files are for. We don't usually #include .c files. –  Fred Larson Aug 9 '13 at 14:13
    
i know. But you can also include .c fils and i didnt want to add 4 files to this message (2 .h and 2 .c). Just wanted to make things more short and simple. –  Kaka Maka Aug 9 '13 at 17:05

4 Answers 4

up vote 5 down vote accepted

Actually, the expansion of #include- type statements is called a "preprocessing" step. I used to think that these steps were all handled as a separate step before any "compiling" happened, but @EricPostpischil pointed out in the comments (and gave an example to demonstrate it) that the two things - preprocessing and compiling - appear to happen concurrently (as the order of lines in the source file dictates). In other words, the expansion of # commands ("preprocessor directives") is done "as compilation happens". In that sense, the error is a "compile" error; but in my mind it is valid to say "the #include gets handled by the preprocessor". When "preprocessor steps" are handled by the compiler, the line is blurred. It is definitely not the linker that is causing the problem - the compiler will have given up long before you get to that step.

As a general comment, it is not good practice to #include one .c file in another - this is what the linker should be used for. And in order to prevent "recursive includes", you will often see a structure like this in the .h files that come with your compiler:

#ifndef __MYINCLUDEFILE
#define __MYINCLUDEFILE
... put the body of the include file here
#endif

this ensures that an include file will only be included once, even if it's called from multiple places (the first time it's included, the __MYINCLUDEFILE variable will be defined; next time it is included, the entire body of the function is skipped). Once you do this with every include file, the kind of "recursive trap" that you fell into can no longer occur.

As was pointed out by @wildplasser, the use of _NAME and __NAME is reserved for the language and the implementation - I am using it as an example because you will see constructs like this in the header files that ship with your compiler. When you create your own .h files you have to think of another convention that creates unique identifiers.

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The preprocessor was integrated into the compiler in GCC years ago (although it can still be invoked explicitly as a separate phase). As defined in the C standard, preprocessing is a part of translation. A C implementation may implement preprocessing separately or unified with the rest of translation. –  Eric Postpischil Aug 9 '13 at 14:30
2  
@EricPostpischil - I guess that is a matter of semantics. The "compiling process" (all of it handled by gcc) consists of a number of steps: preprocessing, compiling, assembling, linking, loading. The fact that you invoke it with a single step doesn't remove the concept that there are multiple phases. I believe it is a fact that all # directives are interpreted / expanded etc. before the first line of code is "compiled". A sample (non authoritative) link: c-links.blogspot.com/2008/09/… . Do you have a counterexample? –  Floris Aug 9 '13 at 14:37
    
@Floris : preprocessor symbols with one or two leading underscores are reserved for the language and the implementation. Better avoid them. –  wildplasser Aug 9 '13 at 14:42
1  
@Floris: It is accurate, but it might just be clearer to omit discussion of preprocessing versus compilation, since it is not really relevant to the question. Recursively including files (without conditions to limit it) is a mistake regardless of when preprocessing occurs. –  Eric Postpischil Aug 9 '13 at 15:29
1  
@Floris: IMHO the order of events is not defined. (obviously a token cannot be seen by the compiler until the preprocessor has emitted it). The rule should probably be seen as an as if rule: the token stream should not differ from the one generated by an isolated preprocessor pass. a "pipelined" implementation (such as GCC) can actually feed tokens into the compiler before the preprocessor has seen EOF on all (include) files. Abort-on-first-error will probably abort the pipe, without allowing it to read upto EOF. No need for that. –  wildplasser Aug 9 '13 at 15:30

There are various stages at which code gets changed.

The includes are expanded in the preprocessing stage. So when you try to make an infinite loop, its actually an error at the preprocessing stage only before any compilation or linking happens.

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Every "stuff" starting with "#" are handled by the preprocessor. That's why the include guard also begin with "#". It has to be handled at the same time.

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It's the preprocessing that already fails. To demonstrate, preprocess the source with

gcc -E try.c

and see it fail.

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